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Texas Rising

Drama . Western . History
 

From the same team that brought us the multiple Emmy Award-winning and ratings-record breaking HATFIELDS & MCCOYS, TEXAS RISING is an 8-hour miniseries that details the Texas Revolution and the rise of the Texas Rangers. Texas Rising stars Bill Paxton, Brendan Fraser, Ray Liotta, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Olivier Martinez, Thomas Jane, Crispin Glover, Rhys Coiro, Jeremy Davies, Cynthia Addai-Robinson, Christopher McDonald, Max Thieriot, Chad Michael Murray, Trevor Donovan, Robert Knepper, Jeff Fahey, Rob Morrow and Kris Kristofferson, and is directed by two-time Oscar-nominated director Roland Joffé (The Killing Fields, The Mission).In 1836, west of the Mississippi was considered the Wild West and the Texas frontier was viewed as hell on earth. Crushed from the outside by Mexican armadas and attacked from within by ferocious Comanche tribes—no one was safe. But this was a time of bravery, a time to die for what you believed in and a time to stand tall against the cruel rule of the Mexican General Santa Anna (Martinez). The heroic General Sam Houston (Paxton), the rag tag Rangers and the legendary "Yellow Rose of Texas" lead this story of the human will to win against insurmountable odds. At the end, the Texas flags stood tall and victorious, claiming a piece of history for all eternity.

 
Status: Ended
TV Channel: History
  • David Hinckley

    There’s doubtless some dramatic license here. No matter. It’s a classic campfire story, from a land that truly was the Wild West.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Ray Rahman

    The action is so saddled with laughable dialogue and dreadful pacing that not even Paxton's always entertaining scene-chewing can make this inherently interesting tale pop as it should. [29 May/5 Jun 2015, p.98]

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Robert Rorke

    Texas Rising doesn’t have the urgency of “Hatfields vs. McCoys,” but Texas enthusiasts will enjoy the blow-by-blow reenactments of a crucial period in American history.

    New York Post Full Review
  • Mary McNamara

    Texas Rising is tonally challenged in a way that regularly undercuts its own inherent drama.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Tirdad Derakhshani

    Richly textured and enjoyable if wildly uneven, the star-studded series tries to marry the hard-nosed, brutally violent realism of modern TV to an antique--some would say antiquated--aesthetic of genteel mannerisms and off-the-wall humor prevalent during the first golden age of TV in the 1950s and '60s.

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • David Wiegand

    At least in the first two episodes sent to critics, the miniseries misses a potentially rich opportunity to tell more nuanced and, hence, more compelling stories of the players in this great, early drama of Texan and American history.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Ed Bark

    By the end of Chapter Two, many viewers might well be in the mood to detour elsewhere rather than follow Houston’s plea to “follow me a little longer down this twisted, bloody road.”

    Uncle Barky Full Review
  • Ken Tucker

    As directed by Roland Joffe (The Killing Fields), Rising has some entertaining shoot-‘em-ups and showdowns, but Joffe is hobbled by the script, which forces him to cut away from Houston to give equal weight to Olivier Martinez’s Santa Anna, the leader of the Mexican army and president of the country, and the subject of some of Rising’s most tedious storytelling.

    Yahoo TV Full Review
  • Neil Genzlinger

    The result is just a disjointed collection of clichés, often staged with the clumsiness of bad community theater.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Kristi Turnquist

    What should be a sweeping, exciting epic about Texas' fight for independence instead comes off as a muddled cross between a costume party and historic re-enactors convention.

    The Oregonian Full Review
  • Brian Lowry

    Nobody fares particularly well here, due largely to a script credited to exec producer Leslie Greif, Darrell Fetty and George Nihil. That said, the wholly one-dimensional way the Mexicans are depicted is troublesome.

    Variety Full Review
  • Matthew Gilbert

    The overall plotting is as disjointed as it is clichéd.

    Boston Globe Full Review
Episode Guide For Show: Texas Rising
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