News: Iwatchonline alternative domain,

Killer Joe

Crime . Thriller . Drama

A cop (Matthew McConaughey) who moonlights as a hit man agrees to kill the hated mother of a desperate drug dealer (Emile Hirsch) in exchange for a tumble with the young man's virginal sister (Juno Temple).

Actors: Jeff Galpin , Danny Epper , Carol Sutton , Gralen Bryant Banks , Marc Macaulay , Juno Temple , Gina Gershon , Thomas Haden Church , Emile Hirsch , Matthew McConaughey
Directors: William Friedkin
Country: USA
Release: 2012-06-29
More Info:
  • Adam Nayman

    Credit goes to the actors (especially Gershon) for giving almost as good as they get in seriously demanding roles, and to Friedkin for having what it takes – guts, chops and a refreshing lack of artistic caution – to bring things thundering home.

    The Globe and Mail (Toronto) Full Review
  • Keith Uhlich

    It's McConaughey who is the real revelation: All Grim Reaper strut and cutthroat stare, he savors each of Letts's vividly ghoulish lines.

    Time Out New York Full Review
  • Nick Pinkerton

    A hideously funny tabloid noir.

    Village Voice Full Review
  • Eric Kohn

    With an eye for gritty, shameless fun, Friedkin unleashes the play's guilty pleasure center. Friedkin holds nothing back, but it's Letts' rambunctious plotting that enables the director to chart a path to the wild climax.

    indieWIRE Full Review
  • Scott Tobias

    This is not some nostalgia-soaked throwback to the noir of old, but a rude, shit-kicking thriller that co-opts - and merrily defiles - a classic like "Double Indemnity." Whatever its shortcomings, at least they're never failures of nerve.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • Oliver Lyttelton

    It won't change the face of cinema history, and it won't win any awards (it's too downright dirty for that), but it's furiously entertaining, and a very strong piece of drama from a director who hasn't much luck in the last thirty-odd years.

    The Playlist Full Review
  • Mike Scott

    An unflinchingly ugly -- but downright mesmerizing -- tale that plumbs the depths of human immorality and, along the way, offers a dash of subtle commentary on just how far we, as a 312 million-member nuclear family, might have lost our way.

    New Orleans Times-Picayune Full Review
  • Bill Goodykoontz

    This is a movie that's just out there, beyond our normal experience in a theater. You may walk away impressed or offended by Killer Joe, but Friedkin and McConaughey make sure you won't walk away indifferent.

    Arizona Republic Full Review
  • Betsy Sharkey

    By far the film's deadliest weapon is McConaughey. The way the actor leans into threats, dropping his voice, wrapping eloquence in sinister tones, is skin-crawling. The muscles in his neck literally seem to tense one by one. And if the eyes are the window to the soul, you really don't want to peer for long into his. It is not an easy performance to watch, but it is unforgettable.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • David Edelstein

    As splashy as Killer Joe is, it's also, beat by beat, meticulously orchestrated, with no shortcuts to the carnage. When it comes to mapping psychoses, Letts and Friedkin are diabolically single-minded cartographers.

    New York Magazine (Vulture) Full Review
  • Andrew O'Hehir

    Friedkin's still got it - the "it" being his ability to infuse every frame of the film with powerful ambiguity and doubt, and also his ability to attract terrific actors and propel them in unexpected directions. Full Review
  • Richard Corliss

    McConaughey's fans might be shocked to see him in this role - more likely, they'd skip the opportunity - but they ought to give his performance a shot. The dimpled demon lover proves he can be just as seductive playing Texas's creepiest, craziest cop.

    Time Full Review
  • Neil Young

    A likeably unpleasant slice of adults-only Texas noir, which aims at the funnybone as much as the jugular.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Matt Mueller

    Friedkin's unflinching trailer-park noir features ugly characters, game performances, degradation and the obscene abuse of a chicken drumstick. Highly recommended, then.

    Total Film Full Review
  • Marc Savlov

    It's ostensibly a Southern-fried comedy of terrors, but what little humor the film evinces almost immediately lodges in your windpipe like an errant bit of K-Fried-C gristle.

    Austin Chronicle Full Review
  • Steven Rea

    Killer Joe is twisted pulp, and the actors chew on it bravely, boldly, and with varying degrees of success.

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • James Berardinelli

    A gleeful and unapologetic descent into delicious decadence, Killer Joe is proud of what it is and never tries to be something it isn't.

    ReelViews Full Review
  • Mick LaSalle

    The hardest thing to describe is tone, but it's the thing that most sets Killer Joe apart and makes it one of the most interesting and satisfying movies of the year so far.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Roger Ebert

    One hell of a movie. It left me speechless. I can't say I loved it. I can't say I hated it. It is expertly directed, flawlessly cast and written with merciless black humor by Tracy Letts.

    Chicago Sun-Times Full Review
  • Peter Travers

    Even when the film goes too far over the top to be saved, McConaughey mesmerizes.

    Rolling Stone Full Review
  • Ed Gonzalez

    It thrills in seeing dumb people getting their due in hyper-stylized displays of violence, and yet it never feels contemptuous of them.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
  • Justin Chang

    The family that slays together pays together in Killer Joe, a nasty little Texas noir that transfers Tracy Letts' 1993 play from page to screen with generally gripping results before devolving into an over-the-top splatterfest.

    Variety Full Review
  • Michelle Orange

    In its own way and to its own detriment, William Friedkin's splattery, southern gothic return to the screen seeks to amuse as well as shake and stir.

    Movieline Full Review
  • Joe Williams

    Killer Joe is one of the most repugnant parodies of small-town stupidity that you will ever see, and Friedkin amplifies the shrill obscenities with blaring cartoon and kung-fu footage from his art director's fever dreams.

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch Full Review
  • Ian Nathan

    Family dysfunction to make Jeremy Kyle blush, but thanks to McConaughey's oily power and Friedkin's unflinching purpose it's a compelling beast.

    Empire Full Review
  • Peter Bradshaw

    It is up to McConaughey's crooked cop to carry the picture: a sleek, loungingly casual loner whose hunger for violence, like his hunger for fried chicken, is finally and horribly gratified.

    The Guardian Full Review
  • Rene Rodriguez

    You end up feeling sorry for all the actors forced to humiliate themselves, except for McConaughey, whose portrayal of sadistic, manipulative evil is mesmerizing, in part because it was so unexpected. He continues to surprise. Friedkin, sadly, continues to coast.

    Miami Herald Full Review
  • Claudia Puig

    The bone-crunchingly violent film has luridly entertaining moments. But by its resolution, this sleazy Southern Gothic nightmare has simply gone off the rails.

    USA Today Full Review
  • Anthony Lane

    Even if you like your movies sick and black, as many people do, it's hard to miss the irony: in the very act of trying to intensify his Southern tale, Friedkin dilutes the impact.

    The New Yorker Full Review
  • Manohla Dargis

    Mr. Friedkin, a director with a talent for kinetic screen violence, never finds his groove with Killer Joe, which lurches from realism to corn-pone absurdism and exploitation-cinema surrealism.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Lisa Schwarzbaum

    Killer Joe throws down a dare by expecting its audience to be the cool connoisseurs of the story's "comic" outrageousness, then rubbing viewers' faces in close-up scenes of brutality that reasonable people ought not to be able to watch. That up-close experience, however effectively done, is a movie specialty that's its own kind of mean.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Rex Reed

    When this sick, ludicrous cocktail of sex, violence and mayhem was first unveiled a year ago at the Toronto International Film Festival, one wag aptly described it as "the ghost of Tennessee Williams meets the spirit of Quentin Tarantino."

    New York Observer Full Review
  • Dana Stevens

    The pleasure of watching McConaughey strut, preen, and menace his way through this Southern-fried black comedy (at least I think it's a comedy) isn't quite enough to save Killer Joe. The whole movie has something tonally off about it, not to mention a theatricality that works against it in a way Bug's didn't.

    Slate Full Review
  • Sara Maria Vizcarrondo

    Killer Joe isn't as outlandish in premise as it is in execution, which is saying something.

    Boxoffice Magazine Full Review
  • Mark Jenkins

    The action and dialogue find the same squalid level in time for the climactic scene, the cruel humiliation of a central character. That's when sensitive viewers should do what the bloody-minded Joe could never imagine: Walk away from the mess he has made.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Elizabeth Weitzman

    What's most notable about this aggressively cynical project is how much talent it wastes.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Kyle Smith

    A sleazy and pointless film about sleazy and pointless people, Killer Joe reminds us that what Quentin Tarantino does isn't easy.

    New York Post Full Review
  • Joe Morgenstern

    Killer Joe is, at bottom - and I mean bottom - ugly and vile, not to mention dumb and clumsy.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
Add Soundtrack
  • 9. These Boots are Made for Walkin (Vocals: Nan Vernon) [Bonus Track] Performer: Tyler Bates Stream Music Online
  • 24. These Boots are Made for Walkin' (Vocals: Nan Vernon) [Bonus Track] Performer: Tyler Bates Stream Music Online