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The Purge: Election Year

Science Fiction . Sci-Fi . Horror . Action

Two years after choosing not to kill the man who killed his son, former police sergeant Leo Barnes has become head of security for Senator Charlene Roan, the front runner in the next Presidential election due to her vow to eliminate the Purge. On the night of what should be the final Purge, a betrayal from within the government forces Barnes and Roan out onto the street where they must fight to survive the night.

Actors: Raymond J. Barry , Edwin Hodge , Mykelti Williamson , Frank Grillo , Elizabeth Mitchell , Ethan Phillips , Terry Serpico , David Aaron Baker , Christopher James Baker , Stephanie McIntyre , Joseph Julian Soria
Directors: James DeMonaco
Country: FRANCE , USA
Release: 2016-07-01
More Info:
  • Katie Walsh

    The biggest, baddest, berserkest Purge so far.

    The Seattle Times Full Review
  • Dave White

    Grillo is exactly the right man for this role, the thoughtful tough guy who can pull bullets out of his own body and who always looks like he needs a shower, but who can’t stop for such indulgences until he knows everyone else is safe. And the ensemble around him forms a tight, empathic unit. We want the Purge to keep going; we also want this crew to smack it down hard.

    TheWrap Full Review
  • Owen Gleiberman

    You’d think the concept would now be wearing thin, but Election Year, which feels like the final chapter in a the best “Purge” film yet. The action is excitingly sustained in a way that it wasn’t in the previous two, and the political dimension, while crude as hell, exerts a brute-force entertainment value.

    Variety Full Review
  • Justin Lowe

    DeMonaco has further upped his game with the third installment by working closely with franchise cinematographer Jacques Jouffret to design rewardingly more complex action sequences and well-focused set pieces that are both efficiently executed and visually engaging.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Michael Phillips

    It's nice to see an action movie take more than a passing interest in where our country is at the moment, and then exaggerating that moment into the realm of shrewd exploitation. To wit: Any film combining an indictment of false religiosity with an indictment of violence-solves-violence political pandering in a single line of dialogue — "These weapons have been cleansed with holy water!" — is OK by me.

    Chicago Tribune Full Review
  • David Fear

    You can be a pissed-off Tea Partier or an Occupy advocate and find something here to stoke your fat cat hatred; either way, catharsis is doled out not in a dusk-til-dawn homicidal free-for all but two harmless hours in a theater.

    Rolling Stone Full Review
  • Chris Nashawaty

    If, on the other hand, it’s sleazy kicks you’re after, you’ll be in exploitation heaven. Because writer-director James DeMonaco’s third chapter in the thrill-kill vigilante franchise is the best and pulpiest Purge yet.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Randall Colburn

    The film’s comical bluntness could also be construed as off putting, but to criticize that is to deprive yourself the joy of such pulp. And this is pulp, from the brazenness of its violence to the dull bite of its clunky dialogue. What Election Year offers isn’t nuanced satire, but rather a kind of catharsis, a release that’s not so far off from what the Purge itself purports to provide.

    Consequence of Sound Full Review
  • Justin Chang

    At times the experience of watching Election Year is a bit like scanning a few years’ worth of alarming headlines while someone sets off firecrackers under your desk. Black Lives Matter, drone warfare, local protests, home-grown militias, predatory capitalism, the Florida electorate, pop pop, bang bang.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • A.O. Scott

    The Purge: Election Year takes itself just seriously enough to provide the expected measure of fun — a blend of aggression, release and relief. A lot of people die, but no one really gets hurt.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

    For all its flaws, Election Year has those baseline pleasures associated with violent American B-movies of the 1970s and ’80s — that mix of simplicity and scuzzy, juicy execution.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • Jared Mobarak

    DeMonaco has his finger on the pulse of our struggle and has found a way to put it onscreen as all good horror does. Sure he and Jason Blum are making money, but you cannot deny they aren’t also forcing us to acknowledge the social science at play.

    The Film Stage Full Review
  • Michael Gingold

    The action is largely routine and the dialogue rarely more than functional, but DeMonaco, marshalling the franchise’s best production values yet, shrewdly taps into the angry zeitgeist; his vision of an America where the citizens are encouraged to express their basest emotions is more relevant than ever.

    Time Out New York Full Review
  • Bilge Ebiri

    If The Purge: Election Year is ultimately still engaging, it’s largely because of the irresistibility of the basic concept itself. But this new movie also makes a pretty good case for why the series should end here: Things have not only come to their logical conclusion, but you get the curious sense that the filmmakers have run out of ideas.

    Village Voice Full Review
  • Britt Hayes

    The Purge has become the new "Saw" franchise: What began with a simple, contained thriller has escalated to outrageous, bloody chaos. And while James Wan’s feature debut was a bit more effective than DeMonaco’s first Purge outing, the latter has Saw’s diminishing returns beat with a recognizable (and coherent) mythology and increasing entertainment value that doesn’t rely on torture porn for thrills. That doesn’t make it any less silly, however.

    ScreenCrush Full Review
  • Drew McWeeny

    This film says everything the first two films tried to say, but better and in a more coherent thematic way.

    Hitfix Full Review
  • Eric Kohn

    In theory, Election Year offers a form of catharsis from contemporary anxieties by turning them into entertainment. Instead, this latest entry in a ridiculous franchise has become a victim of its own sick joke.

    indieWIRE Full Review
  • Tirdad Derakhshani

    The Purge: Election Year tries to show that what counts isn't firepower but compassion, not egoism but community. But frankly, it can't help but shoot itself in the foot: The violence is too tantalizing, too stylized, too fetishistic - the film features killers dressed in fanciful Halloween costumes who dance and sing as they dismember people.

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • James Berardinelli

    The film clearly wants to be more than just a run-of-the-mill horror-thriller but the allegorical aspects are half-baked and the attempts to mimic Kubrick’s "A Clockwork Orange" and "Eyes Wide Shut" feel more like campy satire than an homage.

    ReelViews Full Review
  • Kenji Fujishima

    Its greater focus on disreputable genre thrills comes at the expense of making coherent points about class inequalities, political exploitation, or man's inhumanity.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
  • Peter Hartlaub

    There’s not a lot of nuance or sense in the third “Purge” movie. But it still manages to coast on a combination of self-awareness, crowd-pleasing carnage and a plot that ties perfectly into current events.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Bill Goodykoontz

    There are some good ideas in there, even timely. But eventually, like everything else in the movie, they’re washed away in a sea of blood and a hail of bullets.

    Arizona Republic Full Review
  • Josh Kupecki

    It's the narrative equivalent of Twitter: so much there, but nothing going on.

    Austin Chronicle Full Review
  • Edward Douglas

    After three disturbingly violent films, this may be a concept that deserves to be purged.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Roger Moore

    Whatever subtlety there was remaining in the satirical intentions of The Purge franchise pretty much fly out the door and into the blood-soaked night of The Purge: Election Night.

    Movie Nation Full Review
  • Alan Zilberman

    Even DeMonaco seems bored by the sieges, escapes and gun battles. Silly one-liners are the only saving grace, and that's because such acting veterans as Williamson know how to sell them.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • John Semley

    The problem with the Purge films is they feel like they’re made for people who would actually take part in the purge.

    The Globe and Mail (Toronto) Full Review
  • Kyle Smith

    The Purge: Election Year imagines that, right now, laws are being ignored, people gun each other down with impunity and the death toll is horrendous. It’s too bad the title “Chicago” was already taken.

    New York Post Full Review
  • Simon Abrams

    There's nothing specific, thoughtful or emotionally involving about Election Night beyond a basic need to push buttons, and get a rise out of viewers. The good guys are actually bad, and the bad guys are too indistinct to be hateful. Vote with your wallets, and go see something else. Full Review
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