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Krisha

7/10
Comedy . Drama
 

When Krisha returns for a holiday gathering, the only things standing in her way are family, dogs, and turkey. This movie was expanded from the 2014 short film with the same name.

 
Actors: Augustine Frizzell , Bryan Casserly , Alex Dobrenko , Chase Joliet , Olivia Grace Applegate , Chris Doubek , Bill Wise , Robyn Fairchild , Krisha Fairchild
Directors: Trey Edward Shults
Country: USA
Release: 2016-03-18
More Info:
  • Charlie Schmidlin

    A stunner of a directorial debut.

    The Playlist Full Review
  • Justin Chang

    Shults’s approach craftily favors observation over exposition, and he proves as attentive to Krisha’s surroundings as he is to her inner life.

    Variety Full Review
  • Eric Kohn

    Krisha snaps into focus whenever Shults' camera remains trained on his extraordinary lead, whose fierce commitment easily recalls a similar portrait of middle-aged alcoholism in "A Woman Under the Influence" — and, at under 90 minutes, matches its intensity in half the time.

    indieWIRE Full Review
  • Nico Lang

    Krisha, directed by first-timer Trey Edward Shults, is a masterful opera of discomfort and hurt feelings.

    Consequence of Sound Full Review
  • Michael Phillips

    The naked emotions, when they finally break loose, carry serious weight, akin to a John Cassavetes psychodrama.

    Chicago Tribune Full Review
  • Alan Scherstuhl

    Even the familiar elements of this particular family's drama are invested — through vigorous scripting, directing, and acting — with almost elemental power.

    Village Voice Full Review
  • Robert Abele

    The fertility of Shults' image-making and storytelling skills is almost breathtaking, and much of Krisha draws on the subconscious power of his direction in tandem with Krisha Fairchild's mesmerizing turn.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Manohla Dargis

    When Krisha stands in the kitchen, wild-eyed amid all these human sights and sounds, you see a woman overwhelmed by life itself, as well as a movie that is an expressionistic tour de force.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Joe Morgenstern

    What you call Mr. Shults’s first film is spectacular.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • A.A. Dowd

    At just 82 minutes, Krisha wouldn’t have hurt for a little more meat on its bones; the last act blows through a shitstorm of confrontation almost too abruptly.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • Bill Goodykoontz

    Krisha is a unique film, honest and searing.

    Arizona Republic Full Review
  • David Edelstein

    There’s an extended shot in Trey Edward Shults’s remarkable debut feature, Krisha, that’s a showstopper of bad vibes, a psycho-symphony that bumps the film to a different — more ominous — level of reality.

    New York Magazine (Vulture) Full Review
  • Sheri Linden

    Krisha Fairchild’s lead performance starts off as riveting and grows ever more compelling as the brilliantly off-center story unwinds.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Steven Rea

    Disarming, alarming, and more than a little impressive, Shults' movie was shot in his mother's Texas home, and the thing plays like a cross between Eugene O'Neill and a slasher pic. (It's cut like one; the soundtrack makes you feel jumpy like one.)

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • Ty Burr

    Krisha sucks you into its gradually worsening family dynamic with a confidence of style and a maturity of observation that is remarkable in a home-brewed Kickstarter movie. At times you laugh in horror. At other times you shrink from the screen. There are truths here.

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Sheila O'Malley

    Watching Krisha is a revelation: there are expected "rules" for such material (a former addict returns home for a holiday), but then director/writer Trey Edward Shults breaks every rule, making those rules seem tired and arbitrary in the process, and he does so with bravura, confidence, flash.

    RogerEbert.com Full Review
  • Tricia Olszewski

    All the performances are terrific and lend the film a vérité so keen it may leave you as uncomfortable as the titular outcast.

    TheWrap Full Review
  • Chris Nashawaty

    It’s a small, modest film, but its impact is anything but.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Stephanie Zacharek

    What really registers is how frustrating Krisha’s erratic, furtive behavior would be if she were part of your family — and how deeply sympathetic she is because, thankfully, she is not. Fairchild’s performance is key to the movie: Krisha is witty and chatty one moment, and shut down like a deserted fairground the next.

    Time Full Review
  • Jordan Hoffman

    It is a bravura debut from a young film-maker, proving that one can still make a movie for no money at a family member’s house and come away with a work of art, not just a calling card.

    The Guardian Full Review
  • Tim Grierson

    Even when the filmmaking falters, Krisha Fairchild’s unsettlingly intense lead performance dominates the movie, leaving us feeling as captive as the character’s wary kin.

    Screen International Full Review
  • Josh Kupecki

    Krisha is an exceptionally well done slow burn that ushers a striking new talent onto the film scene. Let's hope that Shults retains that black-sheep sensibility for his future projects.

    Austin Chronicle Full Review
  • Walter Addiego

    It may be as emotionally exhausting for the viewer as for the participants.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Daniel Schindel

    Krisha showcases artistry that’s quite accomplished for a debut feature. That it’s all in service of a story that doesn’t seem to know what it really wants to do or say (other than dismantle its lead) is a shame, but there’s true promise here.

    The Film Stage Full Review
  • Tasha Robinson

    For a first film, made on a shoestring with a largely non-professional cast, Krisha is remarkably textured.

    The Verge Full Review
  • Tom Keogh

    For all its strengths, Krisha can also be self-indulgent and artificial.

    The Seattle Times Full Review
  • Michael O'Sullivan

    It’s slightly fussy, in-your-face filmmaking, but it’s viscerally effective.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • James Lattimer

    It rams home the main character's relentless downward spiral though an incessant parade of grandstanding stylistic flourishes.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
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