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The Two Faces of January

6/10
Thriller . Romance
 

A thriller centered on a con artist, his wife, and a stranger who try to flee a foreign country after one of them is caught up in the murder of a private detective.

 
Actors: Karayianni Margaux , James Sobol Kelly , David Warshofsky , Daisy Bevan , Yiğit Özşener , Nikos Mavrakis , Prometheus Aleifer , Oscar Isaac , Kirsten Dunst , Viggo Mortensen
Directors: Hossein Amini
Country: UK , FRANCE , USA
Release: 2014-08-28
More Info:
  • Steven Rea

    This is Highsmith, and so things do not go as planned for her protagonists. The Two Faces of January - drop-dead gorgeous to behold - is not a merry tale, but a murderous one. Murderously good.

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • Rex Reed

    Carefully directed and gorgeous to look at, with haunting performances and maximum suspense.

    New York Observer Full Review
  • Manohla Dargis

    There’s a mystery here, some thrills and blood, but mostly there are beautiful people and the kind of human hunger that devours everything and everyone in sight.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Betsy Sharkey

    Amini has a powerful acting triumvirate in Mortensen, Dunst and Isaac to help him deal with the capricious nature of this particular tangled web.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Dave Calhoun

    Dunst handles her sidekick role with a mature ease that’s new to her, but it’s the men you remember: Mortensen in psychological freefall and Isaac always tough to read and hiding something behind a handsome, controlled exterior. It’s a gentle and smart blast from the past.

    Time Out London Full Review
  • Angie Errigo

    A superior directorial debut for a smart, literate screenwriter delivers both first-class character drama and edge-of-your-seat suspense.

    Empire Full Review
  • Peter Debruge

    Best known as the screenwriter of such subtext-rich adaptations as “The Wings of the Dove” and “Drive,” Amini excels at conveying the subtle, unspoken tensions between characters, selecting a tightrope-risky example with which to make his directorial debut and orchestrating it with aplomb.

    Variety Full Review
  • Tim Robey

    It’s an elegantly pleasurable period thriller, a film of tidy precision and class.

    The Telegraph Full Review
  • Ty Burr

    This is an unusual role for Mortensen, but after you’ve played a thinking woman’s hunk so long and so well, what else is there?

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Mick LaSalle

    That Hossein Amini, in his first outing as a director, kept all three of these well-known actors in perfect balance suggests a filmmaker who knows how to steer a performance.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Jeff Baker

    A pleasant entertainment, the term Graham Greene used for his thrillers, but slips away from memory as quickly as a summer evening.

    Portland Oregonian Full Review
  • Odie Henderson

    It’s Mortensen and his smokes that seal the deal. Puffing away, he is dangerously sexy and morally dubious, the latter of which makes perfect sense as we are in Patricia Highsmith territory.

    RogerEbert.com Full Review
  • Peter Travers

    Mortensen and Isaac, expertly exchanging the faces of loyalty and betrayal, are both outstanding. Is the film too old-school for short attention spans? Maybe. Rest assured that Amini's shuddery endgame is well worth the wait.

    Rolling Stone Full Review
  • Andrew O'Hehir

    A subtle, underplayed psychological drama with terrific work by all three actors.

    Salon.com Full Review
  • Sam Weisberg

    Mortensen is a pro at the slow burn, and he adds genuinely frightening layers of impulsiveness to this tempest-in-a-teapot scenario. The freshest twist is that each man has a notable advantage over the other.

    Village Voice Full Review
  • Deborah Young

    On his first trip behind the camera, the British-Iranian Amini shows his skill at working with actors and sensing the way they can fill out literary characters. His screenplay generally feels more naturalistic than Highsmith, the dialogue less spare.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

    January skirts by on its tastefulness and appreciation for the source material, however single-minded. It’s a movie of small pleasures: slow-burn suspense; period flavor, with an emphasis on the textures, clothes, and luggage; an effective score by Pedro Almodovar’s regular composer, Alberto Iglesias.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • Tara Karajica

    Amini's directorial debut is a quiet and graceful achievement that suffers from a number of shortcomings but still works on its own terms.



    indieWIRE Full Review
  • Kyle Smith

    A sun-splashed noir that loses its appeal in the last act.

    New York Post Full Review
  • Clayton Dillard

    Superbly acted and sporadically intriguing thriller, yet it has a difficult time locating more stringent meaning and significance beyond its outward narrative of duplicitous actions and veiled motivations.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
  • Elizabeth Weitzman

    If you wait for the grift, you’ll only be disappointed. There are no jolting twists or shocking reveals. The reward lies mostly in accepting each character on his or her terms.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Mike D'Angelo

    For a first-time director, Amini demonstrates considerable skill both with actors and with the camera, giving the film a pungent balance of visual elegance and moral seediness.

    The Dissolve Full Review
  • Steve Rose

    There are many attractive parts to this thriller – handsome leads, a meaty Patricia Highsmith plot, Mediterranean sunlight on cream linen suits – but it's no greater than the sum of them.

    The Guardian Full Review
  • Philip Kemp

    Amini’s film offers elegant pleasures and holds the interest – but it never grips as it should.

    Total Film Full Review
  • Jessica Kiang

    It's a sterile affair, no ambiguity, no ambivalence, just people doing one thing and then another.

    The Playlist Full Review
  • Randy Cordova

    The movie is not uninteresting, but a viewer isn't breathlessly waiting to see how things will wrap up, either. By the third act, you even start to get impatient with the characters. That's not exactly a ringing endorsement.

    Arizona Republic Full Review
  • Anthony Lane

    You should see it just for Chester — the adventurous sham, running ever deeper into a maze of his own devising.

    The New Yorker Full Review
  • Bilge Ebiri

    It’s a case of diminishing returns: gorgeous, occasionally evocative, but, in the end, mostly dull.

    New York Magazine (Vulture) Full Review
  • Joe Morgenstern

    All the pieces would seem to be in place for an effective film, but the direction is zestless, the pace is more often laggardly than leisurely, and the lead performances are surprisingly lifeless, although Mr. Isaac manages to make a virtue of his scammer's deliberate vagueness.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • Daniel Green

    Amini has proven his narrative acumen before and will undoubtedly do so again, but his inaugural stint behind the camera offers only fleeting glimpses of Highsmith's seductive, satirical prose that old hands such as Clément, Hitchcock and Minghella have so notably put to good use.

    CineVue Full Review
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