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How to Train Your Dragon 2

Family . Comedy . Animation . Adventure . Action . Fantasy

The thrilling second chapter of the epic How To Train Your Dragon trilogy brings back the fantastical world of Hiccup and Toothless five years later. While Astrid, Snotlout and the rest of the gang are challenging each other to dragon races (the island's new favorite contact sport), the now inseparable pair journey through the skies, charting unmapped territories and exploring new worlds. When one of their adventures leads to the discovery of a secret ice cave that is home to hundreds of new wild dragons and the mysterious Dragon Rider, the two friends find themselves at the center of a battle to protect the peace.

Actors: America Ferrera , T.J. Miller , Christopher Mintz-Plasse , Craig Ferguson , Kit Harington , Djimon Hounsou , Cate Blanchett , Jonah Hill , Kristen Wiig , Gerard Butler , Jay Baruchel
Directors: Dean DeBlois
Country: USA
Release: 2014-06-13
More Info:
  • John Semley

    It’s not about the world catching up to understand poor, lonesome Hiccup. It’s about Hiccup catching up to the expectations of the world on his own.

    The Globe and Mail (Toronto) Full Review
  • Joe Morgenstern

    Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation — a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons — and one stirring human encounter after another.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • Bill Zwecker

    Not only does this second movie match the charm, wit, animation skill and intelligent storytelling of the original, I think it even exceeds it.

    Chicago Sun-Times Full Review
  • Drew McWeeny

    This is a sequel that has its own story to tell and that gets right down to it, and it expands on the ideas from the first film, but in a way that tells a thematically satisfying and complete story. In other words, this is how franchises are supposed to work.

    HitFix Full Review
  • Peter Debruge

    If necessity is the mother of invention, then DreamWorks’ desire to extend the Dragon franchise has propelled the creative team in the most admirable of directions, resulting in what just may be the mother of all animated sequels.

    Variety Full Review
  • Tirdad Derakhshani

    One of this year's true surprises, the superior animated sequel not only is infused with the same independent spirit and off-kilter aesthetic that enriched the original, it also deepens the first film's major themes.

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • Stephanie Merry

    A riveting, moving and beautifully animated film.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Susan Wloszczyna

    If anyone is concerned about the way women are presented on the big screen these days, just look at how an evolved male like Hiccup respectfully treats his girlfriend Astrid (America Ferrera) and the portrayal of Blanchett’s Valka. Full Review
  • Peter Travers

    It's thrilling, a soaring blend of 3D animation and spectacular storytelling that swerves daringly to honor the healing chaos of family, human and dragon.

    Rolling Stone Full Review
  • Rene Rodriguez

    The movie offers just the right amount of spectacle.

    Miami Herald Full Review
  • Michael Phillips

    Looks, feels and flows like a real movie. It's better than the last few Pixar features, among other things, and from where I sit that includes "Toy Story 3."

    Chicago Tribune Full Review
  • Bob Mondello

    Director Dean DeBlois has been saying this installment is the middle movie in a How to Train Your Dragon trilogy. It's clear that he took inspiration from the first Star Wars trilogy — not a bad model for breathing new life, and yes, a bit of fire, into one of Hollywood's more nuanced animated franchises.

    NPR Full Review
  • Steve Persall

    How to Train Your Dragon 2 is how to make a sequel, when it gets its head out of the clouds.

    Tampa Bay Times Full Review
  • Helen O'Hara

    At times terrifying and too tough for tinies, this is nevertheless a triumphant sequel that puts its faith in Hiccup and Toothless to find a way through dark times for man and dragon. Until we all get our own dragon to go flying with, the result is a story sufficiently thrilling to have us all airborne.

    Empire Full Review
  • Betsy Sharkey

    What DeBlois has deepened in No. 2, is the film's emotional core. Though there are moments when the tension goes slack, the cast steps up to keep things afloat.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Tasha Robinson

    The rote hero/villain face-offs are exciting, but the film is in no hurry to fast-forward to them. DeBlois seems to have a real passion for this world, and like Hiccup, he seems much more interested in soaring through the clouds than in fighting on the ground.

    The Dissolve Full Review
  • Bill Goodykoontz

    The look of the film is amazing. The animation, particularly when the dragons take flight, is seamless.

    Arizona Republic Full Review
  • Kimberley Jones

    I laughed, I cried, I longed for a pet dragon to call my own.

    Austin Chronicle Full Review
  • James Berardinelli

    Visually interesting but offers nothing groundbreaking. The animation is competent but not overwhelming. There's no moment of wonderment.

    ReelViews Full Review
  • Marc Mohan

    Like its 2010 predecessor, it's one of the most gorgeous computer-animated kids' films you'll come across, and one of the few that uses 3-D smartly and effectively.

    Portland Oregonian Full Review
  • Peter Hartlaub

    It is by far the sharpest-looking DreamWorks Animation film to date.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Jody Mitori

    Thankfully, all of the voice actors from the original return, including Kristen Wiig, Jonah Hill and Craig Ferguson, and keep lightening the mood.

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch Full Review
  • Lou Lumenick

    Offers some stunningly beautiful sequences and an engaging, if at times quite dark, story line.

    New York Post Full Review
  • Joe McGovern

    While the original movie benefited from narrative simplicity and an admirable lack of villains, this one paints the screen with too many characters and frequent diversions from the main story, but nevertheless serves up a bountiful and sugary feast for the 3-D-bespectacled eyes.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Bilge Ebiri

    Dragon 2 is at its best when it quiets down and dares to be intimate.

    New York Magazine (Vulture) Full Review
  • Stephen Holden

    Dragon 2 is considerably darker and more self-aware than its forerunner. Both films are speedier than the average animated blockbuster. In places, Dragon 2 is almost too fast to keep up with, and, in other places, it’s a little too dark, at least in 3-D.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Stephanie Zacharek

    The plot is needlessly busy, and much of the action is more manic and indistinct. But How to Train Your Dragon 2 cuts deeper than the first picture — it will be particularly resonant for anyone who has ever worked with or adopted rescue animals — and there are a few sequences of cartoon grandeur.

    Village Voice Full Review
  • Leslie Felperin

    Clearly, these films are the work of people who love animals. More importantly though, going beyond the pat eco-conscious message that every kids’ film has to have, HTTYD2 touches on how complex the emotional bond between a person and an animal can be.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • A.A. Dowd

    There aren’t just more dragons, but more characters, more plot, more everything. The trade-off is that the charm of the original gets a little lost, a casualty of rapid-franchise expansion.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • Oliver Lyttelton

    After meandering for a while, the story kicks into gear in the third act, with a couple of legitimately shocking and well-executed developments that do pack a punch missing elsewhere in the film.

    The Playlist Full Review
  • Tom Russo

    How to Train Your Dragon 2 recaptures those lyrical highs. But returning writer-director Dean DeBlois also aims to layer on more poignancy for Baruchel and his castmates to play. At points, we’re left feeling a little detached.

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Roger Moore

    A cartoon with better animation and livelier action, if fewer jokes. If there’s one thing these sweet-message/great flying sequence movies don’t need is fewer jokes.

    McClatchy-Tribune News Service Full Review
  • Dave Calhoun

    Hats off to Dreamworks for offering some bold surprises in a respectable sequel filled with moments of humour and emotion among its ample noise and movement.

    Time Out London Full Review
  • Elizabeth Weitzman

    Younger kids looking for the cute connection between hesitant teen Hiccup and his loyal dragon, Toothless, may be stunned by the film’s violent tone. At the same time, it’s the unflinching edge that gives the film its unexpected depth.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • David Calhoun

    This is a more rugged affair than, say, "Frozen," and any admirers of that film might find themselves yearning for a few more songs and a little less testosterone.

    Time Out New York Full Review
  • Inkoo Kang

    If there isn't enough to feel, at least there's a lot to look at. Thanks to the superb 3-D direction by DeBlois, we swoop through the air, whoosh down dragons’ tails, and juuust baaaarely squeeze into small crevices, but still, those experiences are only like being on a really great rollercoaster — they don't mean anything.

    TheWrap Full Review
  • Robbie Collin

    The action sequences here are armrest-gripping fun, and you only wish DeBlois and his animators had been even more confident; held their shots even longer; allowed us to enjoy the whistle of the wind and the curve of the dragons’ flight paths without hurriedly cutting away to another angle, and another, and another. When the film flies, it soars.

    The Telegraph Full Review
  • Eric Henderson

    It has the core of a genuine crowd-pleaser, but unfortunately something bigger and more all-consuming keeps getting into its head.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
  • Jordan Hoffman

    What's unfortunate is that Toothless is starring in a toothless story. Full Review
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