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A man who suffers visions of an apocalyptic deluge takes measures to protect his family from the coming flood.

Actors: Marton Csokas , Douglas Booth , Ariane Rinehart , Kevin Durand , Ray Winstone , Anthony Hopkins , Logan Lerman , Emma Watson , Jennifer Connelly , Russell Crowe
Directors: Darren Aronofsky
Country: USA
Release: 2014-03-28
More Info:
  • Steve Persall

    Despite wild deviations in spiritual themes and execution, nothing in Noah approaches sacrilege or surrender, making this an acutely sensible biblical epic. It may simply be too strange for the masses to notice.

    Tampa Bay Times Full Review
  • Richard Corliss

    Darren Aronofsky brings wild ambition and thrilling artistry to one of the Old Testament’s best-known, most dramatic, least plausible stories — Noah and the ark — with Russell Crowe infusing the role of God’s first seaman and zookeeper with all his surly majesty.

    Time Full Review
  • Todd McCarthy

    Darren Aronofsky wrestles one of scripture's most primal stories to the ground and extracts something vital and audacious, while also pushing some aggressive environmentalism, in Noah.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Richard Roeper

    This is a Noah for the 21st century, one of the most dazzling and unforgettable biblical epics ever put on film.

    Chicago Sun-Times Full Review
  • Drew McWeeny

    Darren Aronofsky's Noah is not just one of the most ambitious films I've seen this year, it's one of the most ambitious films I've ever seen.

    HitFix Full Review
  • Lawrence Toppman

    Overall, Noah represents a respectful take on an old story by filmmakers who pose a pertinent question. The Creator promises never again to wipe humanity off the face of the Earth, signing that covenant with the cheering image of a rainbow. Does that mean he won’t let us wipe ourselves out millennia later, if we’re hell-bent on doing so?

    Charlotte Observer Full Review
  • Curtis Woloschuk

    Aronofsky’s first bona-fide blockbuster is a sweat-stained labour of love. Audacious and uncompromising, it’s a legitimate epic.

    Total Film Full Review
  • Robbie Collin

    Aronofsky’s sixth film is not the Noah you know, but a hundred-million-dollar Chinese whisper; a familiar story made newly poetic and strange with a flavour that’s less Genesis than Revelation.

    The Telegraph Full Review
  • Kenneth Turan

    Noah manages to blend the expected with the unexpected and does it with so much gusto and cinematic energy you won't want to divert your eyes from the screen.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Joe Morgenstern

    Noah can be silly or sublime, but it's never less than fascinating. I was on board from start to finish.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • Bill Goodykoontz

    Taken strictly as a piece of filmmaking, Aranofsky's Noah is ambitious. And as theology, well, it may not hew exactly to the letter of the law, but the spirit survives intact.

    Arizona Republic Full Review
  • Dan Jolin

    Inventive, ambitious, brutal and beautiful: a potent mythological epic. But also wilfully challenging, as likely to infuriate as inspire, whether through its unmitigated Old Testament harshness or its eco-message revisionism. If only more blockbusters were like this.

    Empire Full Review
  • Scott Foundas

    It is never less than fascinating — and sometimes dazzling — in its ambitions.

    Variety Full Review
  • Steven Rea

    Darren Aronofsky's Noah is the Old Testament on acid. It's the movie equivalent of Christian death metal. It's an antediluvian Lord of the Rings, fist-pumping, ferocious, apocalyptic, and wet - very wet.

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • Matt Zoller Seitz

    Noah is more of a surrealist nightmare disaster picture fused to a parable of human greed and compassion, all based on the bestselling book of all time, the Bible, mainly the Book of Genesis. Full Review
  • Ann Hornaday

    Viewers may not agree about what they’ve seen when they come out of Noah. But there’s no doubt that Aronofsky has made an ambitious, serious, even visionary motion picture, whose super-sized popcorn-movie vernacular may occasionally submerge the story’s more reflective implications, but never drowns them entirely.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Joe Williams

    If we want a bigger picture, we’ll have to wait for God to green-light “Noah: The Next Generation.”

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch Full Review
  • Lou Lumenick

    Holy ship! Crowe’s grumpy Noah and his dysfunctional clan help God reboot the too-wicked world in this imaginative (but hardly sacrilegious) and visually spectacular elaboration on Genesis.

    New York Post Full Review
  • Peter Travers

    Hold off on burning Aronofsky at the stake till you see Noah, a film of grit, grace and visual wonders that for all its tech-head modernity is built on a spiritual core.

    Rolling Stone Full Review
  • Stephen Whitty

    The film is best when it isn't trying to be an action epic, but is simply being a character study. Here stands a man, asked to prepare for an unspeakable thing by an unknowable presence.

    Portland Oregonian Full Review
  • Mick LaSalle

    Noah is no silly action blockbuster with a Biblical pretext. Rather, it's the product of writer-director Darren Aronofsky's vigorous engagement with the Biblical story and what it might mean in our time.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Rene Rodriguez

    Will Noah anger some rigid purists and scholars because of the liberties it takes? Perhaps. But the point to take home is the message the movie leaves you with, which works regardless of your faith (or lack thereof). Humans are inherently flawed. How we deal with those defects is what truly matters.

    Miami Herald Full Review
  • Roger Moore

    It isn’t “The Ten Commandments” and Crowe is no Charlton Heston. But Noah makes Biblical myth grand in scope and intimate in appeal. The purists can always go argue over “God Isn’t Dead.” The rest of creation can appreciate this rousing good yarn, told with blood and guts and brawn and beauty, with just a hint of madness to the whole enterprise.

    McClatchy-Tribune News Service Full Review
  • Bob Mondello

    All of which makes the film Noah psychologically credible — his behavior is very much what you might expect of a man who has just condemned millions of screaming souls to watery graves. And it makes the film unpredictably suspenseful, which is dramatically the most welcome thing you could ask of a biblical epic.

    NPR Full Review
  • Andrew O'Hehir

    There’s so much delusion and so much delight in Noah that I have trouble distinguishing one from the other, or determining whether its most outlandish flourishes qualify as mistakes or as strokes of genius. Full Review
  • A.O. Scott

    Mr. Aronofsky’s earnest, uneven, intermittently powerful film, is both a psychological case study and a parable of hubris and humility. At its best, its shares some its namesake’s ferocious conviction, and not a little of his madness.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Keith Phipps

    It’s an unwieldy, sometimes overreaching effort, but the laudable ambition makes it easy to forgive some rough patches.

    The Dissolve Full Review
  • Marjorie Baumgarten

    Aronofsky’s story of Noah and his ark is far-removed from our collective recollections of Sunday school pageants and Cecil B. DeMille extravaganzas. Instead, this film opts for the sort of human-scaled realism that almost allows us to smell the dank stench of a menagerie cooped up for 40 days and nights on a water-swept barge.

    Austin Chronicle Full Review
  • A.A. Dowd

    The result is a monolithic slab of Biblical fan fiction, at once deeply serious and seriously silly. It’s a mess, but at least it’s the mess its creators wanted.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • James Berardinelli

    The movie as a whole is a mixed bag. It's overlong and a times sluggish. The fights and battles, designed to give an epic fantasy feel to the movie, are grave miscalculations.

    ReelViews Full Review
  • Claudia Puig

    Noah is no by-the-book Bible story. Think of it as a visually mesmerizing sci-fi adventure saga loosely based on the book of Genesis.

    USA Today Full Review
  • Ty Burr

    Noah is equal parts ridiculous and magnificent, a showman’s folly and a madman’s epic.

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Michael Phillips

    Neither fish nor fowl, neither foul nor inspiring, director and co-writer Darren Aronofsky's strange and often rich new movie Noah has enough actual filmmaking to its name to deserve better handling than a plainly nervous Paramount Pictures has given it.

    Chicago Tribune Full Review
  • Andrew Pulver

    Impressive as much of his film is, however, Aronofsky never quite solves the main challenge of the semi-literal biblical adaptation: what is so economical, and beautifully expressed, on the page can become a heavy, lumbering beast when translated into conventional narrative.

    The Guardian Full Review
  • David Edelstein

    It’s Aronofsky’s least personal work. So you get a fat dose of conventional melodrama with your Old Testament: It’s the antediluvian "Gladiator."

    New York Magazine (Vulture) Full Review
  • Chris Nashawaty

    Noah is a movie about big ideas (environmentalism, heavenly obedience versus earthly love) and even bigger directorial ambitions (how to tell a personal story on the grandest of grand scales). But, in the end, it's also a disappointment. Maybe not one of Biblical proportions, but a disappointment nonetheless.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Charlie Schmidlin

    When focused on the natural world and the internal thoughts of its characters, Noah positively crackles with the energy of a filmmaker inspired by a new perspective on classic material... But the latter half of the film, turgid and hamfisted throughout, cripples the film so severely that it makes one thankful for the added elements to Noah’s story.

    The Playlist Full Review
  • Rex Reed

    The director’s vision is so dark — and Mr. Crowe’s grumbling, sour-stomach persona so much like a Tums commercial — that you don’t care much what happens to him or his ark, which looks like a big barge with a stove pipe in the middle.

    New York Observer Full Review
  • Eric Henderson

    Once the money shots of Darren Aronofsky's version recede, it becomes ever more clear that his intention is to tackle the capriciousness of Old Testament logic. And, ultimately, to assent to it.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
  • Eric Kohn

    The director's murky, ill-conceived take on the world's oldest disaster story contains some of the most pristine visuals produced on a mass studio scale in some time. But it's also constantly tethered to a dull, melodramatic series of events out of whack with any traditional interpretation of the material.

    indieWIRE Full Review
  • Stephanie Zacharek

    Noah is here not to set the record straight, but to set it on its head. This isn't a lavish work of mad genius, it's a movie designed to be a lavish work of mad genius, and there's a difference.

    Village Voice Full Review
  • Keith Uhlich

    Darren Aronofsky’s big-ticket retelling of the biblical legend of Noah (Russell Crowe, so damn serious) is a wildly stupid, yet still train-wreck-fascinating piece of work.

    Time Out New York Full Review
  • James Rocchi

    The execution of that script – is so clumsy and over-written that nothing in it sticks. There’s a symphony of visuals here, and big strange ideas, but when it comes to the actual characters, we get automatons sleepwalking through clichés. Full Review
  • Joe Neumaier

    Noah, Darren Aronofsky’s often ludicrous, occasionally thoughtful epic, puts theology front-and-center, and doubles down on its blockbuster ingredients — like adding huge rock monsters with glowing eyes.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Adam Nayman

    What could have made Noah work is the same sense of urgency – of fateful craziness – that made "Pi" so memorable, and which also factored into the fatal obsessions of "The Wrestler" and "Black Swan" (two very flawed movies that admittedly benefited from stronger lead performances than the one here).

    The Globe and Mail (Toronto) Full Review
  • David Denby

    Noah may not make much sense, but only an artist could have made it. [7 April 2014, p.74]

    The New Yorker Full Review
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