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Americans throw away $57 billion worth of coupons every year. But for savvy savers, coupons can mean the difference between saving and spending thousands of dollars. On Wednesday, December 29 at 8 PM ET/PT, TLC will introduce four of the country's most coupon-obsessed savers who will do anything for a deal. Their game is simple - get as MUCH as possible for as LITTLE as possible. But these extreme couponers aren't just looking to save a few dollars here and there. Instead, they're looking to cash in on some serious savings and they're doing it by any means necessary - dumpster diving for coupons, charting weekly store circulars, creating elaborate math formulas and stocking up on as many products as possible. With over 367 billion coupons printed each year, the addictive art of smart shopping can be an extreme rush for any consumer on "Extreme Couponing".

 
Episode Title: Julie & Faatima
Airs: 2012-11-13 at 20:00
  • Diane Werts

    With two shopping trips in each half-hour, TLC's latest hit is so fast-paced--and such giddy consumerism--that it's fairly irresistible. Also educational.

    Newsday Full Review
  • Tom Gliatto

    This TLC series has hit a cultural nerve, partly because it offers practical, price-cutting tips in an era in which people are jittery about inflation. Also because it's bonkers. [26 May 2011, p.46]

    People Weekly Full Review
  • Linda Stasi

    If you loved the successful couponing special they aired in December, you'll be thrilled with the premiere of the bizarrely watchable Extreme Couponing, a series in which people hoard not just coupons but the stuff they needlessly and endlessly buy with them.

    New York Post Full Review
  • David Knowles

    There's less of voyeuristic queasiness here than in those other shows [Hoarders and Intervention]. Anyway, who doesn't love rooting for the little gal (yes, the couponers are all female in the show's first two episodes) in a quest to outwit the corporate food industry?

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Jon Caramanica

    Moving forward, less time should be devoted to planning and logistics--this is suspenseless television--and more to motivations. There's a "Hoarders" in here, dying to be redeemed.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Hank Stuever

    It's strange how a show meant to generate excitement and promote thriftiness can leave one with a sense of remorse and shame.

    Washington Post Full Review