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Grantchester - S02E01

Drama . Crime . Mystery
 

It's 1954, and just outside the Cambridgeshire village of Grantchester, local vicar Sidney Chambers [James Norton] is enjoying a glorious picnic with his best friend, DI Geordie Keating [Robson Green], Geordie's family, Sidney's shy curate Leonard Finch [Al Weaver] and their grumpy housekeeper Mrs Maguire [Tessa Peake-Jones]. Walking home, their happy day is cut short when DC Phil Wilkinson [Lorne Macfadyen] arrests Sidney – and the charge is sexual assault. Doting father Harding Redmond [Neil Morrissey] is the source of the accusation, horrified at the claims made in the diary of his teenage daughter, Abigail [Gracie Brooke], who has now gone missing, along with the diary itself. After being grilled by DCI Benson [David Troughton], Sidney sets out to prove his innocence, but not before the Archdeacon [Geoff McGivern] sends Sidney's old friend Reverend Sam Milburn [Andrew Knott] over from the neighbouring parish to check up on him. Questioning Abigail's friends at the village youth club, Sidney discovers she had recently spent time with local photographer Daniel Marlowe [Oliver Dimsdale]. Sidney and Geordie discover Daniel's studio is empty – except for the lifeless body of Abigail.With Daniel missing, Sidney and Geordie talk to local teenager Gary Bell [Sam Frenchum], who had previously been accused by Abigail's father of inappropriate behaviour toward her, as well as her family and friends. However, as more and more secrets begin to surface about Abigail's life, it becomes clear that no one knew her as well as they thought. Only by finding her missing diary can Sidney and Geordie pinpoint exactly who was responsible for her death – but will the answer damage their friendship forever?  

 
Episode Title: Episode 1
Airs: 2016-03-02 at 21:00
  • Nancy DeWolf Smith

    The glorious new PBS mystery series Grantchester is a revelation on two fronts and unforgettable on both. It turns back the clock to solve crime in a different era, offering respite from the world around us now even as it reveals how little ever changes about the human heart.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • Tirdad Derakhshani

    It's anything but stale or derivative.

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • David Zurawik

    If you like Brit mysteries, this one set in the post-World War II era is easy to fall for.

    Baltimore Sun Full Review
  • David Wiegand

    Grantchester is a period piece, but it’s fascinating to view it through a contemporary lens. Daisy Coulam’s adaptation is superb: She fleshes out the main characters with a deft hand, to be sure, but takes her time, enabling us to get to know Chambers as we would a new acquaintance.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Ken Tucker

    The show is no masterpiece, despite the PBS rubric it falls under, but it’s dozy fun, and a nice respite from so much of the creepy, “edgy” crime dramas that continue to pop up on network TV like scary clowns.

    Yahoo TV Full Review
  • Matthew Gilbert

    Grantchester makes for very easy viewing, in the manner of so many of the “Masterpiece” mysteries. The murder plots are extremely light and undemanding, without being insulting.

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Maureen Ryan

    It's light and diverting yet respectful of its characters and their histories, thus it can serve as a pleasant, earnest counterbalance to some of TV's darker dramas.

    The Huffington Post Full Review
  • David Hinckley

    Joining the likes of Poirot, Miss Marple, Foyle, Sherlock and a hundred other PBS sleuths is no minor achievement, and Grantchester seems to belong in that company. It is unlikely, however, to break away from the pack.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Mike Hale

    Grantchester will be breezy fun for fans of the form, though the more discerning will be put off by how rudimentary the actual murder mysteries are after being squeezed into 50 minutes (half the norm for this type of show). Others are liable to find it faintly ridiculous, more of a haiku than an actual drama.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Kevin P. Sullivan

    The case is mildly intriguing, but the humdrum PI will have you Googling Sherlock's return date. [16 Jan 2015, p.71]

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review