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Red Band Society - S01E07

Comedy . Drama

Kara, Hunter, Jordi and Dash band together in support of Nurse Jackson, whose actions have caught up with her. Emma meets Leo's friends from home and one Red Bander's circumstances change dramatically.

Episode Title: Know Thyself
Airs: 2014-11-12 at urday
  • Tom Gliatto

    Red Band Society, which could turn out to be one of the best new shows of the fall, is like that, constantly catching you unexpectedly.

    People Weekly Full Review
  • Vicki Hyman

    The show is soapy for sure, but only at the end of the premiere does it descend into the borderline sappiness that could have been its calling card. It helps that the entire cast has charisma to spare--even the kid in the coma.

    Newark Star-Ledger Full Review
  • Mark A. Perigard

    A dramedy poised to be the breakout show of fall — if it can only overcome the trying symptoms of treacle.

    Boston Herald Full Review
  • Terri Schwartz

    Red Band is one of the brightest shining new shows of the fall TV season, thanks to solid writing and great, endearing cast performances.

    Zap2it (Inside the Box) Full Review
  • Kevin Fallon

    Red Band Society is by no means the perfect network drama. (That would be The Good Wife, for those who are keeping count.) But there is something admirable about what it is doing, and about the fact that it has no qualms about it.

    The Daily Beast Full Review
  • Joanne Ostrow

    What could be a trite pitch for togetherness is probed for deeper meaning in an hour that has a big heart behind its hip stance.

    Denver Post Full Review
  • Nancy DeWolf Smith

    An exhilarating burst of fresh air.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • Lori Rackl

    A diverse assortment of teenagers--The Mean Girl (played by Glencoe native Zoe Levin), The Rebel, The Girl Next Door, The Player--try to cope with the challenges of life, not just their life-threatening illnesses, which keeps the series from falling into Debbie Downer territory.

    Chicago Sun-Times Full Review
  • Gail Pennington

    Red Band Society, although sometimes sappy, isn't sad or dreary.

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch Full Review
  • Alan Sepinwall

    If Red Band overdoes it in some areas, it's impressively restrained in others.

    Hitfix Full Review
  • Matthew Gilbert

    It does break your heart, to some extent, if you’re willing to let go of your cynicism for an hour.

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Jethro Nededog

    The writing is fairly predictable on the pilot, which plays a lot of emotional notes we're all very familiar with on TV.... Problems aside, there's a “Wonder Years” quality to Red Band Society that transports viewers back to those simple firsts in life, the coming of age rites of passage that we all instantly understand and can connect to.

    The Wrap Full Review
  • Ellen Gray

    Narrated by Charlie (Griffin Gluck), a 12-year-old in a coma (yes, it's very "If I Stay"), Red Band boasts a telegenic young cast that otherwise spends little time lying down.

    Philadelphia Daily News Full Review
  • Kristi Turnquist

    In a gimmicky touch, it's narrated by a boy in a coma. But despite the easy grabs at our heartstrings–-who in their right mind isn't rooting for young people to get well?–-the pilot benefits from the vivid, likable performances of the cast.

    The Oregonian Full Review
  • Ed Bark

    Red Band Society has enough lightness of being and appealing characters to counterbalance its overall sobering premise.

    Uncle Barky Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    Too much of Band is either overly familiar or overly unfamiliar, such as the young boy in a coma (Griffin Gluck) who serves as an omniscient narrator and who, through some metaphysical stretch, can speak to other patients whenever they lose consciousness.

    USA Today Full Review
  • Robert Lloyd

    If it plays havoc with the realities of medical practice, well, so did "House." And to glamorize, sanitize and romanticize illness is, after all, an old Hollywood tradition; and this is a show with a target audience for whom even death, in soft enough focus, can constitute a sort of wish fulfillment.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    The fault in Red Band Society isn't in the stars, but in the over-writing.

    TV Guide Magazine Full Review
  • Alessandra Stanley

    Red Band Society has a tone that is both sassy and sorrowful, a carefully calculated balance of humor and sentiment. The pilot episode, however, leans too heavily on emotional tugs.

    The New York Times Full Review