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Seinfeld - S09E23


Jerry and George discuss the movies and George's desire to get his fifteen minutes of fame. Kramer is off to the beach. Elaine calls a friend, whose father is in the hospital, with her cell phone; Jerry and George tell her that is a social faux pas. Jerry gets a message from NBC that they want to talk about the pilot. So Jerry and George go to meet with the new vice president of programming, who is interested in turning their pilot into a 13 episode series. Jerry and George begin to make plans to move to California. Jerry interrupts Elaine's phone call to her friend to tell her about the NBC deal. When he finds out what she did, he tells her that was an even greater faux pas than the cell phone. Jerry and George's parents are excited by the news about the NBC deal. NBC offers Jerry & George a perk, free use of one of their private jets to anywhere they want. Kramer returns from the beach, but has a little bit of water trapped in his ear. Kramer warns they'll never come back from LA, "she's a seductress." Hey! He did. The foursome decides where they want to take the private jet. They finally decide on Paris. As they are ready to leave, Elaine plans to call her friend again; Jerry tells her it is not right to rush that kind of phone call. Elaine avoids a faux pas. Newman begs to be brought along, when Jerry denies him, he vows to be there at Jerry's day of reckoning. The private jet, except for George who wanted the one Ted Danson would have gotten impresses everyone. With water still in his ear, Kramer tries to get it out mid-flight. He stumbles into the cockpit and the plane starts going into a crash dive. During the descent, George confesses he cheated during "the contest" and Elaine and Jerry are about to tell each other something important, when the plane corrects itself. The plane puts down in the small town of Latham, Massachusetts for a checkup. The foursome goes into town and debates about if they are going to get back on the plane. They witness the robbery of a fat guy, which they all mock and Kramer videotapes. They are arrested under the Good Samaritan law established by the town. They are looking at a fine of a maximum of $85,000 and up to five years in prison. The guard assumes they are going to be prosecuted since this is the first offense of this kind in the country. Jackie Chiles is called in for their defense. The prosecution decides to look into the past of these four and build a case that will destroy their characters. Rivera Live covers the trial. Jerry and George's parents prepare to go to Latham for the trial. Newman (who's absolutely delighted), Uncle Leo, Peterman, Puddy, Mickey, Bania, Mr. & Mrs. Ross, Rabbi Glickman, Keith Hernandez and George Steinbrenner also make their way to Latham. Jackie tries to give George a moral compass. The judge, Arthur Vandelay, begins the trial. George thinks the name might be a good sign. The trial begins with opening arguments.

Episode Title: The Finale (1)
Airs: 1998-05-14 at
  • Howard Rosenberg

    This is just the kind of amusingly off-center comedy now missing from NBC's lineup, one of those rare, delightful meshings of concept, cast and execution, with producer Tom Cherones providing inspired direction. Nothing is forced. [31 May 1990, p.F9]

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Ken Tucker

    The weakest aspect of Seinfeld is a wacky next-door neighbor played by Michael Richards. Richards is doing little more than an impersonation of Christopher Lloyd's Jim on Taxi, and he ought to cut it out.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Jonathan Storm

    Funny. The characters, even the hip comic star, become likable very quickly. Despite yourself, you'll be laughing before the first commercial. [31 May 1990, p.C11]

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
  • Ann Hodges

    It works. It's different. It's fun, offbeat and charming. [31 May 1990, p.5]

    Houston Chronicle Full Review
  • Tom Shales

    One weak link is fellow stand-up comic Michael Richards as Seinfeld's wacky neighbor. He isn't wacky or neighborly enough; it just doesn't work. But he's in the minority where "Seinfeld" is concerned. You may not convulsively guffaw, but you're bound to convincingly smile. Here's one that worked out just right.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Ben Kubasik

    Seinfeld's gentle humor is easy to take. Unlike other current comedians, such as Andrew Dice Clay or Sam Kinison, Seinfeld isn't angry: He's more awed by the wonder of it all. [13 May 1990, p.13]

    Newsday Full Review
  • John Engstrom

    The writing - so thankfully different from the hammering rhythm of most sitcoms - comes from Seinfeld and Larry David ("Saturday Night Live"). [31 May 1990, p.C5]

    Seattle Post-Intelligencer Full Review
  • Rick Kogan

    There are some who might be jarred by the format, seamless as it is. And still others might be compelled to argue that with this format one gets neither a sitcom nor a comedy show, but insufficient portions of each...But there is an intriguing honesty to this method, and, in its fashion, it shows how life's tiny travail can work its way into comedy club laughs. [31 May 1990, p.C4]

    Chicago Tribune Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    Lacking much in the way of attitude, the show seems obsolete and irrelevant. What it boils down to is that Seinfeld, likable as he may be, is a mayonnaise clown in a world that requires a little horseradish. [31 May 1990, p.3D]

    USA Today Full Review