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Getting On US - S02E02


DiDi takes on greater responsibilities when a hospice program is introduced into the ward. Dawn looks ahead to her future and tries to share her news with Patsy, but inadvertently puts his new initiative in question. Patsy finds himself playing patient when he has a medical emergency. Dottie, an alcoholic patient, looks for ways around doctor's orders.

Episode Title: Is Soap a Hazardous Substance?
Airs: 2014-11-16 at 10:35 pm
  • David Wiegand

    There is a brilliant mix of poignancy and hilarity in Getting On, which is why it all works so well.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Verne Gay

    Its tender moments register without feeling forced while the comedy comes in the form of a constant IV drip.

    Newsday Full Review
  • Mary McNamara

    It's a dark and astonishing gem of a show, with a bravely skillful cast juggling the petty obsessions of the workplace with Much Bigger Issues.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Rob Owen

    There is some pathos in Getting On with regard to the elderly patients, but that's seamlessly interwoven in the darkly funny personal stories of the hospital staff.

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Full Review
  • Todd VanDerWerff

    Getting On captures the drudgery of work and life in this ward, but it also catches glimpses of the beauty, and it’s in those moments that it feels like a series that deserves better than it’s going to get.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • Melissa Maerz

    Getting On is much funnier than its premise suggests. [22 Nov 2013, p.62]

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Bruce Miller

    In a sea of formulaic comedies, this stands out as a lifeboat worth clinging to.

    Sioux City Journal Full Review
  • Neil Genzlinger

    Every so often a staff member, usually DiDi, is shown in a quiet moment with a patient, providing actual care. These small scenes end up being surprisingly moving because this fictional hospital unit, in all its ridiculousness, feels somehow true to life.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Nancy DeWolf Smith

    That these actors can make us care about their characters, or at least feel their pain so acutely, is what elevates Getting On above the miasma of its material.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • Willa Paskin

    It’s almost as impossible to believe, without seeing it, that such a show could be both very funny and occasionally uplifting without ever resorting to cheap sentimentality. But it is.

    Slate Full Review
  • Hank Stuever

    Weirdly enough, Getting On (adapted from the original BBC series) is a witheringly efficient work of satire, easily confident about the humanity and absurdity it’s trying to portray.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Tom Gliatto

    Flawlessly done, but a tough sell. [2 Dec 2013, p.50]

    People Weekly Full Review
  • Mark A. Perigard

    This bleak depiction of hospital work locates the show about two degrees south of “St. Elsewhere.” And yet, after I finished the first three episodes, I realized I was hooked; I wanted more.

    Boston Herald Full Review
  • Lori Rackl

    Get ready to laugh and cry with this touching new comedy about a dysfunctional team of nurses and doctors caring for aging patients in a hospital’s extended-care wing.

    Chicago Sun-Times Full Review
  • Gail Pennington

    Getting On is for mature audiences only, with uncensored language and outrageous behavior all around. If you like comedy with more cringes than chuckles, Getting On could be for you.

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch Full Review
  • Mike Lechevallier

    Adapted from the British series of the same name, Getting On is billed as a comedy, but the show's setting, a neglected geriatric rehabilitation ward, is such an overwhelmingly depressing environment that much of the offbeat humor ends up flatlining.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
  • Robert Bianco

    To be fair, this otherwise languid show does momentarily come to life in its second episode, when Nebraska's June Squibb tears through the unit as a particularly nasty patient. But she leaves and the show recedes into its self-satisfied torpor.

    USA Today Full Review
  • Brian Lowry

    While one might charitably chalk it up to a slightly British sensibility, like too many of pay cable’s current batch of half-hours, whatever humor graces these hallways is so dry it’s questionable whether “comedy” is the proper classification.

    Variety Full Review
  • Tim Goodman

    Getting On is mostly a depressing and unfunny (which is more depressing) look at an eldercare facility, the people winding down their days ignominiously in said facility and a handful of people who work there.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    The pilot episode involves an endless debate over a mysterious "fecal deposit" left on a chair. Let that be a metaphor.

    TV Guide Magazine Full Review