News: Iwatchonline alternative domain,

Masters of Sex - S02E12


After watching an early cut of the documentary, Masters is disturbed by the portrayal of his work. Johnson's move to solidify her custody arrangement with George backfires. Finding justification in Masters' distraction, Libby continues her relationship with Robert. Langham discovers Flo's family's wealth and connections, causing him to re-evaluate his relationship with her. And after repeated testing of their protocol to cure impotence, Masters and Johnson feel they are ready to cure sexual dysfunction.

Episode Title: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised
Airs: 2014-09-28 at 10:00 pm
  • Ed Bark

    Performance is never a problem for the cast of Masters of Sex. Caplan, Sheen and the supporting players keep everything humming in the best new drama of the fall season. You’ll want to watch.

    Uncle Barky Full Review
  • Tom Gliatto

    This is adult entertainment in the very best possible sense. [7 Oct 2013, p.47]

    People Weekly Full Review
  • Willa Paskin

    A gorgeous period drama that swiftly establishes its risqué themes.... Masters of Sex is the best new show of the fall season.

    Slate Full Review
  • Ellen Gray

    Masters of Sex, a biographical drama about sex researchers William Masters (Michael Sheen) and Virginia Johnson (Lizzy Caplan) that makes science sexy.... Sheen and Caplan are beautifully mismatched as the central figures in a story adapted from Thomas Maier's 2009 biography.

    Philadelphia Daily News Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    There is no more fascinating, or entertaining, new series this fall season.

    TV Guide Magazine Full Review
  • David Wiegand

    The performances, nurtured by such A-list directors as Michael Apted and John Madden, are extraordinary. There isn't a clinker in the bunch.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Diane Werts

    Humor is also key in the capacious pilot hour directed by John Madden ("Shakespeare in Love"). Subsequent episodes echo its deft balance of epic scope and whimsical humanity.

    Newsday Full Review
  • Robert Bianco

    A few plotlines look rocky, and a few lines of dialogue stumble, but based on the first six episodes, we're being introduced to a show that can enlighten, entertain and contend for Emmys, all in the same breath.

    USA Today Full Review
  • Hank Stuever

    The characters get better and more complex, the story builds, strange things start to happen and now I can’t wait to see how its interweaving plots unfold.... It’s rare that a show can intuit what the viewer wants and deliver it, but that’s precisely what happened.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Melissa Maerz

    It's a smart show that plays dumb at first, just to get your attention. Masters may not yet be as groundbreaking as the true drama that inspired it. But like Betty, it knows how to fake it until things get real.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Alan Sepinwall

    Masters of Sex is the best new show of the fall by a very long stretch. It's also a refreshing anomaly: a prestige cable drama that doesn't feel like a recombination of elements from 15 shows that came before it.

    Hitfix Full Review
  • Todd VanDerWerff

    From episode three on, [Sheen] begins to give one of the most fascinating performances on TV.

    The A.V. Club Full Review
  • Hal Boedeker

    Richer and more challenging than any new series this fall from broadcasters.

    Orlando Sentinel Full Review
  • Mark Dawidziak

    Although technically listed as a drama, make no mistake, it's one of the funniest programs on TV this season.

    Cleveland Plain Dealer Full Review
  • James Poniewozik

    It's an absorbing, beautifully acted story about science, emerging feminism and American culture. But it's also a gamble on the idea that great TV drama can involve stakes that are not sharpened to pointy tips.

    Time Full Review
  • Joanne Ostrow

    The engrossing, beautifully cast and well acted Masters of Sex is at once the tale of an odd couple and the story of a culture coming of age.

    Denver Post Full Review
  • Lori Rackl

    It makes the most of its pay-TV platform by showing plenty of skin, but the sex scenes service a bigger story made all the more compelling by a couple of strong leads in Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan.

    Chicago Sun-Times Full Review
  • Tom Long

    There’s a lot of humor here, but it’s more innocent than leering. And there’s also a great deal of understandable awkwardness that seems as pertinent to 2013 to the ’50s. You may not want to watch this with Aunt Tildy, but it is certainly worth watching.

    The Detroit News Full Review
  • Emily Nussbaum

    The dialogue isn’t always subtle, but it’s often sharp.

    The New Yorker Full Review
  • Matt Zoller Seitz

    Masters of Sex is an intelligent, assured drama that gets better and better as it goes along.

    New York Magazine (Vulture) Full Review
  • Sara Smith

    Although it’s a medical drama on one level, Masters of Sex is frequently laugh-out-loud funny, with romances, mysteries and coming-of-age stories unfolding throughout its large cast.

    Kansas City Star Full Review
  • Terri Schwartz

    All together Masters of Sex makes an engaging pilot, but it is as yet untested as a premise for a series.

    Zap2it (Inside the Box) Full Review
  • Robert Lloyd

    Without making any extraordinary claims for it, it is easy to watch and to recommend, mostly sweet-natured, with a host of well-shaded performances and almost nothing to insult your intelligence.

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Maureen Ryan

    [Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan] are simply tremendous throughout, and they are the main reason to stick with the show, even when some of the supporting characters grate and parts of it feel like exposition-heavy excerpts from Thomas Maier's book of the same name.

    The Huffington Post Full Review
  • Matthew Gilbert

    It’s an inviting, beautifully acted, and smartly written period drama set in the 1950s

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Alessandra Stanley

    Masters of Sex does an elegant job of reframing their [Masters and Johnson's] strange, complicated and at times deeply cynical partnership into a twisted but intriguing love story.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Tim Goodman

    It was comforting to see that Masters of Sex has depth of vision and plenty of dramatic material to delve into without taking the easy way out with a nipple and a romp every 10 minutes.

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Brian Lowry

    While Masters of Sex might not be a great show as yet, viewed strictly in terms of giving consumers something worth paying for--or at least an experience they couldn’t receive in quite the same way in many other places--it’s the equivalent of a master class in pay-TV development.

    Variety Full Review
  • Mike Lechevallier

    Where Mad Men branches out its individual narratives in a variety of ways, letting its characters deal with problems not related to the workplace, Masters of Sex seems rigidly anchored to its basic premise.

    Slant Magazine Full Review
  • Nancy DeWolf Smith

    Although the first few episodes can be slow going and are inert in spots, the series finds a rhythm by episode four, as it develops characters and side themes to remind us just how dark those dark ages were.

    Wall Street Journal Full Review
  • David Hinckley

    We watch a relationship develop between Johnson and Masters, played particularly well by Caplan. Yet much of Masters still feels clinical, as if it isn’t sure how to remain faithful to the real-life story and still give the TV drama the sex appeal viewers expect.

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Jesse Hassenger

    Regardless of historical veracity, though, some of the drama here is shopworn.

    PopMatters Full Review