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The Simpsons - S15E04

Family . Comedy . Animation

Mr. Burns uses his ATM card and gets a $1000 bill. It hits him in the chest and then blows away, right across town and into the Simpson living room window, where Bart gets a hold of it. His parents (well Marge anyway) make him put up a notice so that the owner might have a chance to claim the bill. When no one can identify the bill, Bart wonders what he can do with his new windfall. He realizes that he can make money showing off his bill, so he opens up the "Museum of Modern Bart" in his tree house. Mr. Burns makes his claim for the bill, but all is not lost. Bart has made over $3000 in admissions to his museum. To make use of the money the family decides to go to England, where Abe recalls having a memorable night with a beautiful English girl named Edwina. In merry ole England, the Simpsons meet Prime Minister Tony Blair. Abe tries to find Edwina, meanwhile the rest of the family tours London. Everything is going fine until Homer slams his rental Mini into the back of the Queen's horse drawn carriage. Homer is put on trial, makes an ass out of himself in court and is thrown into the Tower of London. Lisa finds a way for Homer to escape his tower cell, a secret tunnel once used by Sir Walter Raleigh. Unfortunately the tunnel leads to the Queen's bedroom. Homer's pathetic plea with the Queen works and the family is allowed to leave the country, provided they take Madonna with them. Before boarding the plane, Edwina calls out to Abe, and introduces him to her daughter of 58 years, Abbie, a woman who looks like Homer in drag. Abe runs on board the plane as fast as he can.

Episode Title: The Regina Monologues
Airs: 2003-11-23 at 08:00 pm
  • Ken Tucker

    Groening has created a group of characters whose personalities and motives are more vivid and detailed than the vast majority of sitcoms featuring flesh-and-blood actors.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Richard Zoglin

    [The show] has a good deal of savvy wit.... The Simpsons, however, is strangely off-putting much of the time. The drawings are grotesque without redeeming style or charm (characters have big beady eyes, beaklike noses and spiky hair), and the animation is crude even by TV's low-grade standards.

    Time Full Review
  • Howard Rosenberg

    Easily the the best, cleverest and nuttiest arrival of the 1989-90 season is The Simpsons...It's very small-scale, but perfectly conceived and executed. What we have here from creator Matt Groening is a rare confluence -- delightful writing, pictures and voices fitting like a Matisse. [12 Jan 1990, p.F1]

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • John Engstrom

    "The Simpsons" is both a challenge and a delight. It's also that rarest of TV fauna, a cartoon show with levels of mirth for every brain and pair of eyes in the family. [12 Jan 1990]

    Seattle Post-Intelligencer Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    A hilarious holiday package. [15 Dec 1989, p.3D]

    USA Today Full Review
  • John J. O'Connor

    There is, admittedly, a fine line between being hilariously perceptive and just plain, even objectionably, silly. While habitually teetering on that line, 'The Simpsons' has shown a remarkable ability to come down on the right side most of the time.

    The New York Times Full Review
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