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The Simpsons - S14E22

Family . Comedy . Animation
 

The family goes to the Springfield Botanical Gardens, where they and the other residents are there to see the blossoming of the Sumatran Century Flower. When his bar is empty, Moe finds out that is where all his customers have gone and he goes to join them. With a capacity crowd plus one on hand, Chief Wiggum has to send someone away and he selects Moe. As a result, Moe is one of the only ones to not be driven out of town by the obnoxious and somewhat lethal (to other plant life) smell of the Sumatran Century Flower when it finally does bloom. The mass exodus from Springfield results in a huge traffic jam on the Springfield Bridge. When traffic begins to move, Homer hits the accelerator, only to have to immediately slam on the brakes, because traffic didn't move that far. The quick stop to family car and the faulty seat restraint that was holding Maggie in the backseat causes her to be launch through the sunroof and over the side of the bridge. She lands in the arms of Moe, who was perched on the side of the bridge ready to commit suicide. Moe becomes a hero. Moe stops by to see Maggie and winds up watching her when Marge needs to care of Grampa, who's out on the street acting crazier than normal. Moe becomes Maggie's fulltime babysitter. Moe entertains Maggie by telling her a story; of course it's "The Godfather" saga. Late in the evening after Maggie's birthday party, where Homer began to learn that Maggie prefers Moe over him, Marge and Homer hear Maggie crying. They go to her room only to find Moe already there calming her down. They forbid him to ever see her again. The next day, Moe is lonely and missing Maggie. That night, outside her window, Maggie overhears Fat Tony and his boys plan to take out the Castellaneta family. She crawls out her window and begins pursuing them. Marge discovers Maggie is gone and they immediately suspect Moe. When Moe doesn't have her and he finds out she is missing, he offers to help. Clues outside Maggie's window reveal that the mob was gathered outside of her window and Moe suggests that they might find her in little Italy. At a restaurant in Little Italy Maggie finds she is in the middle of an "Italian-American Mexican standoff." Moe volunteers to go in and rescue her. He draws the mobster's attention to Maggie which causes them to all go soft. Moe returns Maggie to Homer and Marge and prepares to leave; only Maggie doesn't want him to go. Homer and Marge agree that Moe can have the occasional play date with Maggie, provided he brings along his ham to accompany Homer.

 
Episode Title: Moe Baby Blues
Airs: 2003-05-18 at 08:00 pm
  • Ken Tucker

    Groening has created a group of characters whose personalities and motives are more vivid and detailed than the vast majority of sitcoms featuring flesh-and-blood actors.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Richard Zoglin

    [The show] has a good deal of savvy wit.... The Simpsons, however, is strangely off-putting much of the time. The drawings are grotesque without redeeming style or charm (characters have big beady eyes, beaklike noses and spiky hair), and the animation is crude even by TV's low-grade standards.

    Time Full Review
  • Howard Rosenberg

    Easily the the best, cleverest and nuttiest arrival of the 1989-90 season is The Simpsons...It's very small-scale, but perfectly conceived and executed. What we have here from creator Matt Groening is a rare confluence -- delightful writing, pictures and voices fitting like a Matisse. [12 Jan 1990, p.F1]

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • John Engstrom

    "The Simpsons" is both a challenge and a delight. It's also that rarest of TV fauna, a cartoon show with levels of mirth for every brain and pair of eyes in the family. [12 Jan 1990]

    Seattle Post-Intelligencer Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    A hilarious holiday package. [15 Dec 1989, p.3D]

    USA Today Full Review
  • John J. O'Connor

    There is, admittedly, a fine line between being hilariously perceptive and just plain, even objectionably, silly. While habitually teetering on that line, 'The Simpsons' has shown a remarkable ability to come down on the right side most of the time.

    The New York Times Full Review
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