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The Simpsons - S13E17

Family . Comedy . Animation

Our story begins a la "Forrest Gump", with Homer sitting on a park bench waiting for the rest of the family to arrive. While Chief Wiggum initially tells him isn't interested in hearing Homer's life story initially, he becomes intrigued as Homer goes right into it, in the form of flashbacks (clips). Homer is picked up and brought blindfolded to the Springfield Friar's Club where emcee Krusty the Klown and other friends and family roast Homer with their memories (more clips from past episodes). Bart and Lisa start followed by Mr. Burns, Grampa Simpson & Agnes Skinner, Reverend Lovejoy & Ned Flanders (a la "The Smothers Brothers"). The proceedings are interrupted by Kodos and Kang, whom rest the entire fate of humanity upon one human being, Homer Simpson; they cite him as "the fat selfish epitome of modern man". They probe him revealing more clips, which helps prove to them that humans are unfit to continue existing. Lisa talks them into probing the innocent mind of a child. The probing of Maggie's mind reveals to Kodos and Kang the most important thing of all for them; Earth is where there favorite celebrities live. Kodos and Kang attend the "People Choice Awards" and the episode ends with a wacky little ditty celebrating more clips, but telling the viewers "not to fear, they have stories for years."

Episode Title: Gump Roast
Airs: 2002-04-21 at 08:00 pm
  • Ken Tucker

    Groening has created a group of characters whose personalities and motives are more vivid and detailed than the vast majority of sitcoms featuring flesh-and-blood actors.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Richard Zoglin

    [The show] has a good deal of savvy wit.... The Simpsons, however, is strangely off-putting much of the time. The drawings are grotesque without redeeming style or charm (characters have big beady eyes, beaklike noses and spiky hair), and the animation is crude even by TV's low-grade standards.

    Time Full Review
  • Howard Rosenberg

    Easily the the best, cleverest and nuttiest arrival of the 1989-90 season is The Simpsons...It's very small-scale, but perfectly conceived and executed. What we have here from creator Matt Groening is a rare confluence -- delightful writing, pictures and voices fitting like a Matisse. [12 Jan 1990, p.F1]

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • John Engstrom

    "The Simpsons" is both a challenge and a delight. It's also that rarest of TV fauna, a cartoon show with levels of mirth for every brain and pair of eyes in the family. [12 Jan 1990]

    Seattle Post-Intelligencer Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    A hilarious holiday package. [15 Dec 1989, p.3D]

    USA Today Full Review
  • John J. O'Connor

    There is, admittedly, a fine line between being hilariously perceptive and just plain, even objectionably, silly. While habitually teetering on that line, 'The Simpsons' has shown a remarkable ability to come down on the right side most of the time.

    The New York Times Full Review
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