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The Simpsons - S14E11

Family . Comedy . Animation

Lisa dreams of being honored as one of three great Americans, only to be waken by Marge's vacuum. Marge and the rest of the family have begun spring cleaning. Bart finds a box of old videotapes. He and Lisa start watching the tapes that are boring them, until Lisa finds a tape labeled "BART SAD." They put in the tape, which features an episode of Perfect Strangers and a commercial for a product that fights bad breath for babies. The baby featured in the ad is none other than Bart, leading Lisa to realize the tape should have been titled "Bart's Ad." The baby in the ad is referred to as "Baby Stinkbreath," which opens Bart up to name calling by his siblings. Bart confronts his parents about the ad and Homer tells him he was going to tell him on his "death bed." They tell him he enjoyed making the commercials and he made a lot of money that Homer invested in a college trust fund. Homer confesses that he used the money to buy back incriminating photos. Bart demands the return of his money; Milhouse suggests that he get a lawyer. He finds a lawyer and tells him he wants a divorce from his parents. In court, Judge Harm renders her verdict, Bart is emancipated and half Homer's salary is to go to Bart. Bart moves out and into a loft apartment. His first night alone he is scared by a rat and runs to the elevator that takes him up instead of down. The doors open to a loft apartment that contains skateboard ramps, "skate boarding legend Tony Hawk" and the band "blink - 182" playing live in the corner. The family comes to visit Bart at his new home, where Bart appears to be living the good life. Homer makes a plea for his return, but Bart tells them he is taking off for six months to go on the "Skewed Extreme Sports Tour." At the Springfield stop of the tour, Homer talks Tony Hawk into losing to him in a skateboarding contest so that Homer might win back Bart's affection. When wins the contest, Bart informs him it was about being cool, it was really about Homer not caring about how he felt. With a bit of advice from Tony Hawk, Homer makes an apology and gets a lucrative commercial endorsement for "Viagra-Gain" which allows him to repay Bart, who returns home.

Episode Title: Barting Over
Airs: 2003-02-16 at 08:00 pm
  • Ken Tucker

    Groening has created a group of characters whose personalities and motives are more vivid and detailed than the vast majority of sitcoms featuring flesh-and-blood actors.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Richard Zoglin

    [The show] has a good deal of savvy wit.... The Simpsons, however, is strangely off-putting much of the time. The drawings are grotesque without redeeming style or charm (characters have big beady eyes, beaklike noses and spiky hair), and the animation is crude even by TV's low-grade standards.

    Time Full Review
  • Howard Rosenberg

    Easily the the best, cleverest and nuttiest arrival of the 1989-90 season is The Simpsons...It's very small-scale, but perfectly conceived and executed. What we have here from creator Matt Groening is a rare confluence -- delightful writing, pictures and voices fitting like a Matisse. [12 Jan 1990, p.F1]

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • John Engstrom

    "The Simpsons" is both a challenge and a delight. It's also that rarest of TV fauna, a cartoon show with levels of mirth for every brain and pair of eyes in the family. [12 Jan 1990]

    Seattle Post-Intelligencer Full Review
  • Matt Roush

    A hilarious holiday package. [15 Dec 1989, p.3D]

    USA Today Full Review
  • John J. O'Connor

    There is, admittedly, a fine line between being hilariously perceptive and just plain, even objectionably, silly. While habitually teetering on that line, 'The Simpsons' has shown a remarkable ability to come down on the right side most of the time.

    The New York Times Full Review
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