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When Berta is forced to bring her granddaughter Prudence to work with her, the boys find themselves a little preoccupied with her.

Episode Title: Camel Filters + Pheromones
Airs: 2004-01-5 at 09:00 pm
  • Glenn Garvin

    Sheen and Cryer breathe some life into this thing, but a mercy killing might have been simpler. [22 Sept 2003, p.4E]

    Miami Herald Full Review
  • Alan Sepinwall

    Can someone please wake up Charlie Sheen? I know he's tried to build an entire career, Dean Martin-style, on half-lidded apathy, but as one-third of the new CBS sitcom Two and a Half Men, he's practically comatose. [22 Sept 2003, p.T35]

    Newark Star-Ledger Full Review
  • Virginia Heffernan

    If you're feeling charitable, too, you might wrench a laugh out of the final line of the pilot, one in which a woman in a grocery store mistakes Charlie and Alan for boyfriends. But it's testament to the show's thoroughgoing dreariness that an old gay-misunderstanding joke is the best line in it. Or maybe the moment is happy because the show's over.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Preston Turegano

    Two and a Half Men -- a new run-of-the-mill, heavily laugh-track-ladened comedy series from CBS -- will make a lot of people bitter, especially ordinary, middle-class folk. [22 Sept 2003, p.D-5]

    San Diego Union-Tribune Full Review
  • Steve Johnson

    But despite the presence of such first-rate talent as Cryer and Holland Taylor (as the brothers' mom), the series is uninspired. [22 Sept 2003, p.7]

    Chicago Tribune Full Review
  • Noel Holston

    It's also one of those shows composed of such familiar ingredients, it already feels like a rerun. [22 Sept 2003, p.B02]

    Newsday Full Review
  • David Bianculli

    Sheen has no problem grounding the show, and encouraging viewers to laugh at his character. It's Cryer, though, who brings the more delightful offbeat energy to Two and a Half Men. When complaining about his wife's change of heart, he seems genuinely anxious and betrayed - but always manages to inject a flustered comic edge that makes the pain amusing, as well as real. [22 Sept 2003, p.77]

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • Mike Duffy

    Two and a Half Men manages to generate some smiles. Series creator Chuck Lorre ("Dharma & Greg") has scrounged up a few funny moments for the series premiere. But not enough of them. [22 Sept 2003, p.6E]

    Detroit Free Press Full Review
  • Gail Pennington

    The laughs - more like chuckles, actually - are predictable, but Jones is a cutie, and he and Sheen are charming together. [22 Sept 2003, p.E6]

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch Full Review
  • Matthew Gilbert

    It's just a thoroughly conventional multi-camera sitcom rooted in familiar Felix-Oscar shtick and that tried-and-true comic standby, a cute kid. It's old school...And happy to be that way. [22 Sept 2003, p.B7]

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Adam Buckman

    Sheen is so entertaining to watch that the series at least earns a 2 1/2-star rating. It also earns one on the basis of its name, which invites the irresistible parallel.

    New York Post Full Review
  • If you prize originality, this new series will underwhelm you. ... What's surprising is the goodly number of laughs it does offer.

    People Weekly Full Review
  • Gillian Flynn

    'Two and a Half''s setup ain't edgy, but its humor is a tad more genial -- brotherly ribbing as opposed to bad-tempered potshots. Its one nasty spot revolves around, unsurprisingly, women.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • David Zurawik

    The Sheen persona wears thin after a while, and Jones is just another kid actor with a goofy-sweet face. But what could make this sitcom fly is Cryer. He injects Alan with a manic energy that literally lifts the pilot into a higher comic gear each time he begins to catalog or rant about all his anxieties and fears. [22 Sept 2003, p.1C]

    Baltimore Sun Full Review
  • Brian Lowry

    Men hardly qualifies as groundbreaking, but it's smooth and self-assured in its "Odd Couple" milieu. [22 Sept 2003, p.34]

    Variety Full Review
  • Staff [Not Credited]

    A word about the supporting cast: excellent. Holland Taylor is an expert at playing strong-willed, domineering women and shines as Evelyn, Charlie and Alan's mother. There are similarly strong contributions from Hinkle as Judith and from Melanie Lynskey as Rose, a nonthreatening stalker with a fixation on Charlie. [22 Sept 2003]

    The Hollywood Reporter Full Review
  • Ed Bark

    It all makes for an easy-to-take sitcom whose best moment finds Jake and Charlie singing the theme song he wrote for Maple Loops cereal. There are some funny lines at a poker game, too, where the kid turns out to be quite a bluffer. [22 Sept 2003, p.12E]

    Dallas Morning News Full Review
  • Bill Goodykoontz

    Sounds ho-hum, but it's really quite funny. Sheen may be playing himself, but he plays himself well, and Cryer is a gas. [22 Sept 2003, p.E1]

    Arizona Republic Full Review
  • Tim Goodman

    In what must be considered something of a stunner on several levels, Two and a Half Men, a new sitcom, is actually funny.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Mike McDaniel

    This isn't a laugh riot, but it's got promise. And with that cushy time slot, right after Raymond . [22 Sept 2003, p.6]

    Houston Chronicle Full Review
  • Robert Lloyd

    The already evident lesson is that a moldy premise need not stand in the way of a good time. [22 Sept 2003, p.E1]

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Tom Shales

    One of the most endearing new comedies of the year.

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Chuck Barney

    The rather trite concept is freshened up by some colorful writing that actually happens to be funny, and by engaging "Odd Couple"-like performances from Sheen and Cryer, who play well off each other. The series is also a prime-time rarity - a sweet domestic comedy that isn't overly sappy. [22 Sept 2003, p.D01]

    San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times Full Review
  • Robert Bianco

    What Men offers is the pleasure of watching people who know what they're doing do it well. Jones' mixture of bratty spunk and vulnerability keeps Jake from seeming too precocious or too cute. Sheen is so amusingly sardonic and cheerfully self-aware, he makes Charlie's immaturity endearing rather than annoying. And there just aren't many actors who are better at funny-fussbudget than Cryer -- or who have more polished comic skills.

    USA Today Full Review
  • Scott D. Pierce

    Whether Cryer is all of that in real life, I don't know. But I do know that both he and Sheen seem to have found the perfect sitcom roles in "Men." The show is a hoot. [22 Sept 2003, p.C08]

    Deseret News Full Review
  • Rob Owen

    The right sitcom at the right time. Well-cast, well written and actually funny (imagine that!), this one's a keeper. [22 Sept 2003, p.D-8]

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Full Review
  • Aaron Barnhart

    This show has great casting, comedy that crackles and characters who show signs of actually possessing some depth to them. These are rare qualities for any TV show, which is why I ranked it my second-favorite new series of the fall. [22 Sept 2003, p.E8]

    Kansas City Star Full Review
  • Hal Boedeker

    A show that is sweet without being sappy, sexy without being sophomoric and witty without being nasty...This delight rests on the inspired casting of Charlie Sheen and Jon Cryer as brothers tossed together during a family crisis. Their pairing could be the best sitcom partnership since Jack Klugman teamed with Tony Randall on The Odd Couple. [21 Sept 2003, p.4]

    Orlando Sentinel Full Review
  • Jonathan Storm

    The best traditional sitcom to arrive on the tube since "Everybody Loves Raymond." Perfectly cast, sharply written. [22 Sept 2003, p.E06]

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review