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House - S03 E20

Mystery . Comedy . Drama
 

The doctors try to find what's wrong with a scam artist who collapses after her brain "freezes," but the case becomes personal for Foreman.

 
Episode Title: House Training
Airs: 2007-04-24 at 09:00 pm
  • Tom Shales

    The most electrifying new main character to hit television in years. [16 Nov 2004, p.C01]

    Washington Post Full Review
  • Linda Stasi

    What would you get if you combined the brains behind "The Usual Suspects" and "The X-Men" with the writer of "Quiz Show" and "Homicide: Life On the Streets"? Aside from a lotta smarts, you'd get House, the best new show since "Lost." [16 Nov 2004, p.91]

    New York Post Full Review
  • Rob Owen

    An engrossing new series with a fascinatingly unsympathetic character at its core. [14 Nov 2004, p.TV--5]

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Full Review
  • Manuel Mendoza

    In place of the by-now clichés, House substitutes wit, taut writing and a performance by British actor Hugh Laurie that should put him immediately in the running for a best-actor Emmy. [16 Nov 2004, p.14E]

    Dallas Morning News Full Review
  • Charlie McCollum

    House is a rarity for TV: a true anti-hero, someone who's hard to embrace but easy to accept. [15 Nov 2004, p.2C]

    San Jose Mercury News/Contra Costa Times Full Review
  • James Poniewozik

    Funny, probing and unsentimental, House may shock the systems of viewers used to sweetie M.D.s like ER's Dr. Carter. But as an honest look at techno-medicine and the prerogatives of genius, it's a tonic.

    Time Full Review
  • Alan Sepinwall

    At turns funny, terrifying and moving. [16 Nov 2004, p.73]

    Newark Star-Ledger Full Review
  • Mark Dawidziak

    Although the promising drama has its self-conscious moments when the offbeat stuff seems a trifle forced, Laurie delivers a consistently fascinating performance as the abrasive diagnostician. Even with the labored interludes, the series stands as, to borrow an old rock lyric, “a very, very, very fine” House. [16 Nov 2004, p.E4]

    Cleveland Plain Dealer Full Review
  • Aaron Barnhart

    Hugh Laurie is simply brilliant as the sarcastic, Vicodin-popping, cane-clutching healer in House. You want to see a heroic doctor? Go watch Matthew Fox save an island on "Lost." Want to see a terrific performance by a comedic actor who may singlehandedly save the medical drama? Here's your guy. [16 Nov 2004, p.E3]

    Kansas City Star Full Review
  • Sid Smith

    Entertaining, genre-bending. [16 Nov 2004, p.C1]

    Chicago Tribune Full Review
  • Joanne Ostrow

    Laurie is a wonder. His drawn face, scraggly beard, hollowed eyes and gaunt body add an offbeat distinction to his dignified performance. His is a sinister quirkiness. [15 Nov 2004, p.F-01]

    Denver Post Full Review
  • Diane Werts

    He's rude, sarcastic, bitter, brilliant and, delightfully, the most compelling character of the fall TV season. [14 Nov 2004, p.11]

    Newsday Full Review
  • Robert Bianco

    This is one House call worth making.

    USA Today Full Review
  • Gillian Flynn

    Between Laurie's more-great-than-good doctor and cases that encompass everything from bad ham to complete body meltdown, House preys on all that's wrong (and some of what's right) with modern medicine.

    Entertainment Weekly Full Review
  • Matthew Gilbert

    What a treat it is to find a medical show that doesn't turn its talented MDs into bedside saints in order to calm viewers' fears about mechanical HMO factories.

    Boston Globe Full Review
  • Terry Kelleher

    House stands out on the strength of its misanthropic main character.

    People Weekly Full Review
  • Mike McDaniel

    Exceptional producers Paul Attanasio (Homicide: Life on the Street), David Shore (Hack), Katie Jacobs (Gideon's Crossing) and Bryan Singer (X-Men) have cast their lot with Laurie (Peter's Friends, Sense and Sensibility, Stuart Little), and it pays off handsomely. Despite House's peculiarities, he's a fully rounded character, and Laurie appears comfortable in his clothes. [16 Nov 2004, p.8]

    Houston Chronicle Full Review
  • Mike Duffy

    Television always needs smart, quality shows. And with "ER" on creative life support after 10 years, this challenging new medical drama could be good entertainment therapy. But for many viewers, "House" could be a tough pill to swallow. [15 Nov 2004, p.1C]

    Detroit Free Press Full Review
  • Gail Pennington

    Hugh Laurie is cranky, scathingly honest, brilliant Dr. Gregory House, whose amazing diagnostic abilities almost make up for his abrasive personality, in the Fox medical drama House. [16 Nov 2004, p.E06]

    St. Louis Post-Dispatch Full Review
  • Paul Brownfield

    This kind of straight, no-chaser approach to patient care is what makes House a satisfying riff on any number of doctors I've seen on TV and know I will never have taking care of me. [16 Nov 2004, p.E1]

    Los Angeles Times Full Review
  • Ellen Gray

    But if you watch this one at all - and Fox hasn't increased the odds by waiting so long to introduce it - it'll be for Laurie's fierce and funny exploration of the doctor in House. [16 Nov 2004, p.53]

    Philadelphia Daily News Full Review
  • Brian Lowry

    House could well be one of those development stories where the operation is successful but the patient still dies. A well-made medical hour with an intriguing star, the show feels somewhat mismatched with Fox's lineup and instantly stale based on its resemblance to NBC's "Medical Investigation," which was clearly grown in the same Petri dish. [15 Nov 2004, p.4]

    Variety Full Review
  • David Bianculli

    It's the detection, as well as the detective, that draws you and holds you here. Neither the cases nor the characters are simple - and in both cases, that's a compliment. [16 Nov 2004, p.107]

    New York Daily News Full Review
  • David Zurawik

    His team is formulaic - and that's not a good thing. Omar Epps plays neurologist Dr. Eric Foreman. He's African-American, and even though he had great medical school grades, House says he was chosen for his "street smarts." Jennifer Morrison is immunologist Dr. Allison Cameron, and, while she is beautiful and brainy, in the second episode, she acknowledges some sexual issues. Jesse Spencer, as intensive-care specialist Dr. Robert Chase, is from the WASP world of old money, but nothing he says or does in the first two episodes offers any social-class insights. [16 Nov 2004, p.1C]

    Baltimore Sun Full Review
  • Scott D. Pierce

    There isn't that much to distinguish it from umpteen shows that have gone before. [15 Nov 2004]

    Deseret News Full Review
  • Phil Rosenthal

    Clearly inspired in style and substance by "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," its sick cases are more interesting than, say, NBC's new "Medical Investigation," but that's setting the bar awfully low. [16 Nov 2004, p.49]

    Chicago Sun-Times Full Review
  • Tim Goodman

    House had enough going against it, but if you strip it of its boldness in favor of rote (and predictable) drama, then you might as well bring in the priest.

    San Francisco Chronicle Full Review
  • Alessandra Stanley

    The show's characters are flat and so is the writing, but there is something universally appealing about blood, guts and a rushing gurney. There is no Dr. Feelgood in House, but the patients' symptoms provide a little consolation.

    The New York Times Full Review
  • Hal Boedeker

    Unfortunately, the scripts put the stricken through such horrendous suffering that the show becomes an endurance test for the viewer. [14 Nov 2004, p.3]

    Orlando Sentinel Full Review
  • Jonathan Storm

    Not only will reality-show fans be disappointed, so will anybody looking for a little humanity sprinkled in with the enormous overdose of pretentious claptrap. [16 Nov 2004, p.F1]

    Philadelphia Inquirer Full Review
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